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Moikeha


The History of Moikeha. Fornander

———

CHAPTER I.

IT IS commonly spoken of in the history of Moikeha that he came from the land known as Moaulanuiakea, and that he was a great chief; that he had lived with Kapo, from whom a child was born to whom he gave the name of Laamaikahiki. That upon the arrival of Olopana and his wife Luukia in Tahiti from Hawaii, Moikeha became infatuated with Luukia and soon after took her as his paramour. Olopana, the husband of Luukia, harbored no ill feeling at this action of Moikeha, but looked on without showing his disapproval, and was, in fact, of one mind with his friend.

Some time after this Olopana became the prime minister of all the lands of Tahiti. At about this time Mua, a Tahitian Prince, also became infatuated with Luukia, but his approaches were not approved, or, rather, were not encouraged by Luukia, although he, upon several occasions, pressed his suit with great vigor. When he saw that although his suit was being rejected, that of Moikeha’s was being accepted, he thereupon made up his mind to sow discord between her and her lover, and in that way persuade Luukia to be separated from Moikeha.

Moikeha was a chief who was very fond of athletic sports and often joined in the games of pahee,1 olohu,2 and various other games. It was often the case at these places where the games were held for people to gather and to cheer the winners. In the course of these games the cheering and commotion were often heard by Luukia.

One day Mua, in order to carry out his designs to sow discord between Moikeha and Luukia, happened to be in the presence of Luukia when the cheering at the games was heard, and, believing that the opportune moment was come, asked Luukia: “Say, Luukia, do you hear the cheering at the king’s games?” Luukia answered: “Yes, I hear the cheering.” Mua then remarked to Luukia: “You must not for one moment think that that cheering at all means well for you. No, Moikeha is publicly defaming you. That cheering is not intended for your good.”

Upon hearing these words of falsehood, Luukia took them to heart and believed them to be true, so she grew angry at Moikeha and made up her mind not even to live with him as in days gone by. Luukia thereupon ordered her immediate attendants to lash herself in such a way as to bar herself against his approaches. Luukia was then corded with a fine rope from her waist to the middle of her thighs, and the ends of therope were then fixed in such a way as to make them almost impossible to be found.

After Moikeha had enjoyed himself in the games, he came home without at all thinking that anything wrong had taken place in his domestic affairs; but in this he was disappointed. Upon Moikeha’s arrival at home he met Luukia, and although there was some small change in his reception, still on the whole he was treated in the usual manner, Luukia entering into conversation with him. It was only after Moikeha had discovered that Luukia had been lashed that she ceased speaking to him. Immediately upon arriving at the palace, Moikeha saw that there was something wrong by Luukia’s countenance, and he at once began to ponder within himself as to the probable cause of the trouble.

That night, while in their preparation to retire, Moikeha was surprised at seeing Luukia retiring with her pau still on, something entirely unusual with her, she not having done anything of the kind during their peaceful days. Moikeha, however, did not show his surprise by any utterance, but bided his own time for four nights with the determination if possible to find out the cause of this extraordinary behavior on the part of Luukia. On the fourth night Moikeha saw no change, Luukia still wore the pau on retiring. The next night, Moikeha, with a desire to ascertain the cause of this queer behavior, undertook to unfasten the pau, and after it was unfastened he saw that Luukia had been corded from her waist to the middle of her thighs. Upon making this discovery, Moikeha asked Luukia why she had done this, but she made no reply. From evening until midnight Moikeha urged her to tell him the cause of this lashing, but she utterly refused to even say one word. All through the rest of the night Moikeha pondered over this recent change that came over Luukia and said to himself: “Your actions are indeed strange. Here we have been living right along in peace, and now you will not even speak to me. What fault have I committed that you should cause yonrself to be lashed in this manner? Very well then, I am going to absent myself from you and shall go to some other laud, and thus give you a chance to have your wish fulfilled.”

Thereupon, Moikeha directed his foster-sou to make ready the double canoe in the following words: “Let us sail for Hawaii, because I am so agonized for love of this woman (Luukia). When the ridge-pole of my house, Lanikeha, disappears below the horizon, then I shall cease to think of Tahiti.” Kamahualele then directed the paddlers to get the double canoe ready. As soon as this was done Moikeha took his sisters, Makapuu and Makaaoa, his two younger brothers, Kumukahi and Haehae. He also took his priest Mookini1 and the chief men who wait on him, such as his navigators and sailing masters, his immediate attendants and favorites, and also his spies who were to spy out the laud.

One early morning at dawn, just at the rise of the star Sinus, Moikeha boarded his double canoe, taking with him all his attendants and followers, and set out from Tahiti. From that morn until sunrise when they first beheld Hilo all went well,

whereupon Kamahualele stood up and prayed by way of a mele their voyage hither. Upon their arrival at Hilo, Kumukahi and Haehae became charmed with Hilo, and so expressed to Moikeha their desire to remain there, whereupon Moikeha allowed them to take up their residence at Hilo.

Moikeha soon after set sail from Hilo, sailing along the north coast of Hawaii until they arrived at Kohala, when Mookini and Kaluawilinau expressed their desire to take up their residence at Kohala. Moikeha therefore landed them there. On leaving Kohala they sailed along the eastern coast of Maui until they reached Hana, when one of his men, Honuaula, expressed his desire of making this his place of residence, so he too was allowed to remain behind. From this last place they sailed on until they were between Lanai and Molokai. When directly opposite Kawela, Kamahualele spied a canoe directly out from the Kalaau Point, when their course was changed and the canoe was steered towards this canoe by Kamahualele. Upon their arrival at the place where the canoe was floating, they found it was Kakakauhanui. This man’s usual occupation was fishing, and it was his daily custom to come to this place for this purpose.

When Moikeha saw this man who was large and well built, and had the appearence of being a powerful and fearless man, Moikeha took him to be his friend, and upon leaving him gave the following instructions: “I am going to leave you here, while I continue on to look fora place for us to reside in, when I shall send some one to bring you to me.” After giving the above instructions, Moikeha and his people left Kalaau Point and continued on their journey. Upon arriving at Oahu, Moikeha’s sisters expressed their wish to remain in Oahu and make their homes here, so Makapuu and Makaaoa requested Moikeha to allow them to remain, saying: “We wish to make this our place of residence, where we can see the cloud drifts of Tahiti.” Because of this desire on the part of the two sisters, Makapuu and Makaaoa, they were allowed to remain on Oahu, thus leaving Moikeha, his foster-son Kamahualele, the two paddlers Kapahi and Moanaikaiaiwe, Kipunuiaiakamau and his companion, and the two spies Kaukaukamunolea and his companion, to continue on the journey.

They then set sail from Oahu and continued on their way until they arrived at Wailua. This was late in the evening, being dark when they arrived, so they did not land, but moored their double canoe all that night until the next day. Early in themorning the people saw this double canoe floating in the sea with the kapu sticks of a chief aboard. About this time the canoes made for the lauding and were lifted up and deposited on the shore. When the travelers landed, the people were gathering in great numbers to go surf-riding at the surf of Kamakaiwa. In this gathering of people were the two daughters of the king of Kauai, who were on their way to ride the surf; they were Hooipoikamalanai and Hinauu. Upon seeing the people on their way to ride the surf, Moikeha and his companions also followed along to take part in this morning exercise. Moikeha was a goodly man to look upon, he had dark reddish hair and a tall commanding figure.

When Hooipoikamalanai and her sister saw Moikeha they immediately fell in love with him, and they then and there made up their minds to take him to be their husband. Moikeha in the meantime was also struck with the beauty and grace of the two sisters, and he, too, fell in love with them and decided to take one of the girls to be his wife. After enjoying the surf for a time, Hooipoikamalanai and her sister returned home and informed their father of what they had seen, and said: “We wish to take that young chief as a husband for one of us.”

Upon hearing the wish of his daughters, the father decided to send for Moikeha, so orders were issued that he be brought to the house of the two princesses. Moikeha and his company were thereupon sent for and were brought in the presence of the king. The love on the part of the young people being mutual, Hooipoikamalanai and Hinauu took Moikeha to be their husband. So Moikeha thus became king of Kauai after the death of his father-in-law.

CHAPTER II. MOIKEHA’S RESIDENCE ON KAUAI AND HIS DOINGS.

AFTER Moikeha had taken Hooipoikamalanai and Hinauu to be his wives, he became the king of Kauai, after the death of his father-in-law. Moikeha had five children with his two wives, all boys. In this genealogy of Moikeha his issue is seen to have continued until the reign of Manookalanipo, who became the ancestor of the chiefs of Kauai and Niihau. But none of those who know anything of this genealogy can produce a direct line with any degree of accuracy.

After the events stated above, Moikeha assigned himself to the task of making his wives and children happy, giving his undivided attention to the bringing up of his boys, and in this way Moikeha thought no more of Luukia. Some time after this, Moikeha’s thoughts were carried back to his son Laamaikahiki, his child with Kapo, and he began to have a yearning desire to see Laamaikahiki. So at a given time he called his five sous together and said to them: “I am thinking of sending one of you boys to go to your elder brother and bring him to Hawaii.” Upon hearing the wish of their father, the boys became greatly excited and they all spoke out: “Let me go! Let me go!!” and so on. This was carried on for some time.

When Moikeha saw that his sons were excited and were so worked up that there was much contention among them, he devised a way of giving them a test at something, to determine who should go to Tahiti. Upon deciding what the nature of the test was to be, he called his sons to him and said: “I have decided to give you a test, and the boy who shall excel over the others, he shall be the one to go and bring your brother.” He then took the boys to the river in the order of their birth. But before this he told his sous: “Let each of you bring his ti-leaf canoe1 and sail it across the river, each one to have but one trial, and under no condition are you to have a second trial. The one whose canoe shall come between my thighs, that boy shall be the one to go and bring your brother.”

After giving them these instructions he proceeded to the opposite bank of the river and sat down at the edge of the water directly facing the wind. The boys in the meantime proceeded to the windward at a point right opposite their father. The oldest boy then set his canoe down in the water and steered it for the desired point, but it missed the mark, as it sailed off in another direction. The second boy then set his canoe down in the water and it, too, missed the mark. The third and fourth boys also took their turns and they too failed to hit the desired mark. Then Kila, the youngest son of Moikeha, took his canoe and set it down in the water and it sailed directly to his father and passed between his thighs. When his brothers saw that their youngest brother had won they became very angry and from then on they tried to devise some way of killing him.

Some time after this his older brothers enticed him to go and play at shooting arrows, but as their parents were aware of the fact that they had no love for their youngest brother, their father did not allow Kila to accompany them. The older brothers then coaxed him and pretended to be kind to him in every way possible, but their father, Moikeha, would not allow him to go along with them.

At last, when it was almost time for Kila to undertake his trip to Tahiti, to bring Laamaikahiki, Moikeha then thought of giving him the desired permission to accompany his older brothers. Upon deciding that he would do this Moikeha told Kila: “My son, I am not going to keep you away from your brothers any longer. You can now accompany them. It is possible that the journey you are to undertake may take you away from them altogether, so you may now accompany them wherever they go. After the kapu days of the temple are ended, in the following days you shall then sail for Tahiti.” Kila then replied: “You must not permit me to accompany my brothers for I might get killed. I think you ought to provide them with a god so that they will fear the god and in that way prevent them from killing me. Then I think it will be safe for me to accompany my brothers.” When Moikeha saw that the boy had used good judgment in the matter, he called his sous together and told them that they must now have a god. Upon hearing this the boys would not consent to such a proposition. At this Moikeha approved of Kila’s discretion and therefore refused to allow him to accompany his brothers in their excursions.

Shortly after this Moikeha proceeded to get everything in readiness for Kila’s voyage to Tahiti as was formerly planned by him. Before he set out for Tahiti, Moikeha advised him as follows: “When you sail from here, go by way of Oahu, and don’t fail to call on your aunts; they are living on the side of Oahu facing Molokai. If you call they will not mistake you for a stranger.”

After imparting these words of advice, Moikeha picked out the men who were to accompany Kila on this voyage. Kamahualele was selected as his companion, he being Moikeha’s foster-son. Kapahi and Moanaikaiaiwa, were selected as the paddlers. Kipunuiaiakamau and his companion were selected as the navigators and sailing masters. In case the canoe was likely to run aground, Kamahualele would call out: “Kipunuiaiakamau, hold on!” Then he and his companion would back water and the canoe would go backwards. This is the reason why these two men were named Kipunuiaiakamau. Kaukaukamunolea and his companion, two of them, were selected as pilots. These were the men that were selected to accompany Kila on his voyage to Tahiti.

When he was about ready to set sail, some of the Kauai people expressed their desire to accompany him on his voyage, Hooholoku and his companion. And upon the expressed wish of Kamahualele he was permitted to take Kuaiwilu and Kauineno, making about nine in this company together with the chief, making it ten all told.

When the men who were to accompany Kila were ready, Moikeha took the priests who were versed in the study of the heavens and ordered them to see if the chiefs journey would be undertaken in safety. After studying the heavens, the priests announced that the chief could take the journey in safety. But not wishing to take any risk, Wanahili, one of the priests, was selected to accompany him, thus making eleven in the company all told.

In the dawn of the day advised by the priests as the proper time to undertake the voyage, just as the star Sirius was rising, Kila set sail for Oahu. Upon arriving off the shore of the place directed by his father as the place where his aunts were living he laid to in his canoe and called out: “My greetings to you, Makapuu and Makaaoa.”

Makapuu and Makaaoa. “Who are you?” “I am Kila of the uplands, Kila of the lowlands, Kila-pa-Wahineikamalanai. I am the offspring of Moikeha.”

Makapuu and Makaaoa. “Is Moikeha then still living?” “He is still living.”

Makapuu and sister. “What is he doing?” “He is dwelling in ease in Kauai where the sun rises and sets; where the surf of Makaiwa curves and bends; where the kukui blossoms of Puna change; where the waters of Wailua stretch out. He will live and die in Kauai.”

Makapuu and sister. “What journey is this that brings the chief to us?” “It is a journey iu search of a chief.”

Makapuu and sister. “In search of what chief?” “Of Laamaikahiki.”

After this, they left Oahu and sailed for Kalaau Point where Moikeha’s friend Kakakauhanui was living. Kila again called out as he did to his aunts. This calling was kept up until all the people left by Moikeha from Oahu to Hawaii had been heard from, when they proceeded on their way to Tahiti.

On this voyage they first touched at Moaulanuiakeaiki where Kupohihi, a human rat, was living, one of Moikeha’s uncles. They called at Kupohihi’s because they were without food. Again Kila called out to his granduncle in the same manner as when he called on Ms aunts, and they were supplied with food. Upon their arrival at Moaulanuiakeaiki, they saw Lanikeha, the palace of Moikeha which was located on Moaulanuiakeanui. After staying in this place for a few days, they again set sail for Moaulanuiakeanui. Upon running the canoe on the beach, Kila and Kamahualele set out to call on Luukia. When Kila arrived at the place where Luukia was living, he called out: “My greetings to you, Luukia.”

Luukia. “Who are you?” “I am Kila of the uplands, Kila of the lowlands, Kila-pa-Wahineikamalanai. I am the offspring of Moikeha.”

Luukia. “Is Moikeha then still living?” “He is still living.”

Luukia. “What is he doing?” “He is indulging in ease in Kauai where the sun rises and sets; where the surf of Makaiwa curves and bends; where the kukui blossoms of Puna change; where the waters of Wailua stretch out. He will live and die in Kauai.”

Luukia. “What journey is this that brings the chief to me?” “It is a journey in search of a chief.”

Luukia. “In search of what chief?” “Of Laamaikahiki.”

Luukia. “Your brother is in the mountain of Kapaahu; he is hidden; we have not seen him.”

At the close of this conversation between Kila and Luukia, Kila retired to Lanikeha to Moikeha’s residence, the palace at Moaulanuiakea. Some time after this Kamahualele and Kila started off for the place where Laamaikahiki was being hidden, but they were not able to find him at this time. After looking for Laamaikahiki for several days they were still unable to find him, so Kila gave up looking for him and rested for a few days.

On the first day prior to the kapu nights, Kila spoke to Kamahualele. “You had better get our double canoe ready and let us return, because I have about decided to give up the search for the chief. It is best that we return and tell Moikeha of our inability to find him, so as to give Moikeha a chance to send some others.”

Kamahualele then proceeded to carry out the orders of Kila, although he was not at all willing to give up the search. After pondering the matter over, Kamahualele started off to find Kuhelepolani an aged sorceress, a priestess of Olopana, and bring her iu the presence of Kila. Kamahualele then spoke to Kila: “Let us delay undertaking our voyage home for a while, for I believe it best to do so, and in the meantime let us see if the old woman cannot find the chief for us. She is a priestess to Olopana. It may be possible for her to direct us to the place where your brother is now living.”

Although such a thing was altogether new to Kila, still he was made glad by the mere prospects of again trying to locate the object of their search. So, in order to understand the matter more clearly he questioned Kamahualele: “What is a priestess? What does she do?” Upon hearing these questions put by Kila, Kamahualele described the character and duties of a priestess to him. After Kamahualele had explained what the priestess could do, Kila asked the priestess to begin her duties so as to enable him to see Laamaikahiki.

CHAPTER III.

THE PROPHECY OF THE OLD WOMAN IN THE PRESENCE OF KILA AND HER DIRECTION AS TO HOW LAAMAIKAHIKI COULD BE FOUND.

AS KILA was very anxious to find Laamaikahiki, Kuhelepolani undertook to explain to him what he should do in order to find Laamaikahiki. “In one day from now you shall find Laamaikahiki in the mountain of Kapaahu. When we hear the beating of the drum, Hawea, the drum which belongs to your father, Moikeha, then you must take a human being and sacrifice him on the altar at Lanikeha, your father’s temple; then you will be able to see your brother, for it is a sign of sacrifice when that drum is beaten during the kapu nights. Tomorrow night is the night when the kapu is most strict of all nights, and it has always been so from your father’s time.”

On the evening of the following day, or the day after the instructions were given by the old woman, the notes of the drum of Laamaikahiki were heard. Upon hearing the notes of the drum Kamahualele was ordered to procure a person for the sacrifice and place it on the altar according to the instructions of the aged priestess. During this night, at the time the notes of the drum were heard, Kuhelepolani came to Kila and asked him: “Did you hear the notes of the drum? The time has come when you will see your brother. You must now follow me. Wherever you see me go you must follow directly behind me.”

All that night Kila followed the aged priestess, and this was continued from the morning of the next day until evening, when-they arrived near the place where Laamaikahiki was living. Kuhelepolani then told him: “Let us remain here until we again hear the notes of the drum, when yon will enter into the mua,1 the house where the people worship. When we get to the door of the mua, then you must go right in and conceal yourself in one of the inside corners. You must then remain in your hiding place until your brother enters the house, then be watehful; the one who approaches and strikes the drum is Laamaikahiki; but wait until the priests get in line and begin the chanting, then call him.”

After these instructions, they remained where they were until they heard the beating of the drum. Late that evening, after the sun had set, they approached the door of the mua and Kila went in and hid himself where Kuhelepolani had instructed him. As soon as he entered the mua, Kuhelepolani rose and walked away from the mua, as it was the law that women should keep away from such places. Women were forbidden to be near the kapu houses. Not very long after Kila had entered the mua, Laamaikahiki came in and went and stood near the drum, where he remained awaiting for the arrival of the priests before the prayer was to be recited. Shortly after this the priests who were to join in the recital of the prayer with the chief entered. As soon as the priests entered, one of them offered a prayer, at the close of which they made their preparation for the recital.

At this moment Kila came forth calling out: “My greetings to you, Laamaikahiki.”

Laamaikahiki. “Who are you?” “I am Kila of the uplands, Kila of the low-lands, Kila-pa-Wahineikamalanai. I am the offspring of Moikeha.”

Laamaikahiki. “Is Moikeha then still living?” “He is still living.”

Laamaikahiki. “What is he doing?” “He is indulging in ease in Kauai where the sun rises and sets; where the surf of Makaiwa curves and bends: where the kukui blossoms of Puna change; where the waters of Wailua stretch out. He will live and die in Kauai.”

Because of the answers given by Kila, Laamaikahiki again asked: “What is the purpose of this journey that has brought you here?” Kila replied: “I have been sent by our father to come and take you to him as he is very anxious to see all his children together. The journey was taken under his orders. Upon my arrival here I was unable to find you; but just as I was about to give up the search and had ordered my men to get things ready for our return, an old woman came to me and advised me how to find you.”

Upon hearing the words from Kila, Laamaikahiki immediately prepared to accompany his brother to Hawaii in obedience to the wish of Moikeha. As soon as Laamaikahiki decided to do this, he took his priests, his god Lonoikaoualii, and the men that came with Kila and set sail for Hawaii. When they were approaching near Kauai, Laamaikahiki began beating his drum. No sooner was this done than Moikeha heard the tone of his drum which informed him that Laamaikahiki was about to arrive with his brother. Moikeha then ordered to have everything in readiness, the land as well as the house, for the reception of the chief Laamaikahiki.

Upon the arrival of Laamaikahiki and Kila, Laamaikahiki was taken by the hand by the high priest of Kauai, Poloahilani, to the temple together with his god Lonoikaoualii. It is said that Laamaikahiki was the first person who brought idols to Hawaii.

Laamaikahiki lived in Kauai for a time, when he moved over to Kahikinui in Maui. This place was named iu honor of Laamaikahiki. As the place was too windy, Laamaikahiki left it and sailed for the west coast of the island of Kahoolawe, where he lived until he finally left for Tahiti. It is said that because Laamaikahiki lived on Kahoolawe, and set sail from that island, was the reason why the ocean to the west of Kahoolawe is called “the road to Tahiti”.

After Laamaikahiki had lived on Kahoolawe for a time, his priests became dissatisfied with the place, so Laamaikahiki left Kahoolawe and returned to Kauai. Upon the death of Moikeha the land descended to Kila, and Laamaikahiki returned to Tahiti.

CHAPTER IV. THE REIGN OF KILA AND THE JEALOUSY OF HIS BROTHERS.

AFTER the death of Moikeha, his dead body was taken to the cliffs of Haena where it was deposited until a convenient time for Kila to remove it to Tahiti. Soon after this Kila began to assume the reins of government and ruled in place of Moikeha, according to the wish of his late father, his mother and aunt, and his mother’s father.

When he became king of Kauai and had taken charge of things just as his father had done before him, he saw that his reign was not going to be as peaceable as he would like to have it, as his brothers were jealous of his being made the king of Kauai. This jealousy on the part of the brothers, coupled with their hatred of him for having been sent to Tahiti, made them feel all the more bitter against him. How ever, with all this bitter feeling entertained by his brothers, all his commands during any of the large undertakings were always obeyed, they not having the courage to refuse to obey the orders of the king. But with all this obedience on their part, Kila’s reign was not altogether satisfactory. The older brothers often met secretly to consult one another as to the best way of concealing their hatred and bitter feelings from their brother. At one of these meetings they adopted a certain course and decided to draw Kila into consenting to do a certain thing, although it was several days after the proposition was matured, in the following way:

Upon coming to him, one of the brothers said: “Say, Kila, we believe it best that we all go and bring back the bones of our father for you to remove them to Tahiti.” Upon hearing the request of his brothers, which he thought quite proper, he immediately consented to the proposition. He was, however, actuated to readily acceed to this request because he had on another occasion already talked with his mother and aunt on the matter. When the brothers heard that he was willing to carry out their request, they proceeded to get the canoe ready for their journey to Haena for the purpose, as has been said, of removing the bones of their father to their home before the same were to bo taken by Kila to Tahiti.

When the mothers, Hooipoikamalanai and Hinauu, saw the boys preparing the double canoe, they approached them and asked them: “What journey is this that you are going to undertake with the canoe you are preparing?” The boys replied: “We are going after the bones of our father and bring them here, for Kila to remove them later on to Tahiti.” The mothers again asked: “How many of you are going?” The boys replied: “All of us, including our brother.”

When Hooipoikamalanai and Hinauu heard these remarks they replied: “If you are going with your brother, then we too will accompany you.”

The boys remarked: “Why should you two go, to take up that much room of the canoe? Do you think we would not be able to bring the bones by ourselves?”

The mothers replied: “We are not going to allow your brother to accompany you, for we know you do not respect him and you do not treat him as you should. We are not sure that you will take good care of him.” When the boys heard their mothers make these remarks they were afraid lest their scheme would fall through, so they swore in the name of their god that no harm would come to the king. When Hooipoikamalanai and her sister saw that the boys had sworn to take good care of the king, they allowed him to accompany his brothers.

Very early in the morning, after everything was made ready, the brothers took Kila and set sail for Oahu. The winds from Kauai during the night being very favorable, they soon were in sight of Molokai. Kila all this time was on the covered platform. As the paddlers were robust and strong they soon arrived off the coast of Kauwiki,


When he became king of Kauai and had taken charge of things just as his father had done before him, he saw that his reign was not going to be as peaceable as he would like to have it, as his brothers were jealous of his being made the king of Kauai. This jealousy on the part of the brothers, coupled with their hatred of him for having been sent to Tahiti, made them feel all the more bitter against him. How ever, with all this bitter feeling entertained by his brothers, all his commands during any of the large undertakings were always obeyed, they not having the courage to refuse to obey the orders of the king. But with all this obedience on their part, Kila’s reign was not altogether satisfactory. The older brothers often met secretly to consult one another as to the best way of concealing their hatred and bitter feelings from their brother. At one of these meetings they adopted a certain course and decided to draw Kila into consenting to do a certain thing, although it was several days after the proposition was matured, in the following way:

Upon coming to him, one of the brothers said: “Say, Kila, we believe it best that we all go and bring back the bones of our father for you to remove them to Tahiti.” Upon hearing the request of his brothers, which he thought quite proper, he immediately consented to the proposition. He was, however, actuated to readily acceed to this request because he had on another occasion already talked with his mother and aunt on the matter. When the brothers heard that he was willing to carry out their request, they proceeded to get the canoe ready for their journey to Haena for the purpose, as has been said, of removing the bones of their father to their home before the same were to bo taken by Kila to Tahiti.

When the mothers, Hooipoikamalanai and Hinauu, saw the boys preparing the double canoe, they approached them and asked them: “What journey is this that you are going to undertake with the canoe you are preparing?” The boys replied: “We are going after the bones of our father and bring them here, for Kila to remove them later on to Tahiti.” The mothers again asked: “How many of you are going?” The boys replied: “All of us, including our brother.”

When Hooipoikamalanai and Hinauu heard these remarks they replied: “If you are going with your brother, then we too will accompany you.”

The boys remarked: “Why should you two go, to take up that much room of the canoe? Do you think we would not be able to bring the bones by ourselves?”

The mothers replied: “We are not going to allow your brother to accompany you, for we know you do not respect him and you do not treat him as you should. We are not sure that you will take good care of him.” When the boys heard their mothers make these remarks they were afraid lest their scheme would fall through, so they swore in the name of their god that no harm would come to the king. When Hooipoikamalanai and her sister saw that the boys had sworn to take good care of the king, they allowed him to accompany his brothers.

Very early in the morning, after everything was made ready, the brothers took Kila and set sail for Oahu. The winds from Kauai during the night being very favorable, they soon were in sight of Molokai. Kila all this time was on the covered platform. As the paddlers were robust and strong they soon arrived off the coast of Kauwiki,

at Hana; about midnight they arrived at Waipio, Hawaii. Immediately upon their arrival, while Kila was still asleep, they took him off the canoe and left hint on the beach at Waipio, he in the meantime not knowing his brothers’ actions. The brothers then proceeded to kidnap a young man from Waipio whose skin was similar to Kila’s and returned to Kauai. When they reached Puuloa on their way home, Umalehu, Moikeha’s eldest son slew the boy they had brought from Waipio, then cut off his hands and took them to their mothers for the purpose of showing them all that was left of Kila, with the report that he had been eaten by a shark.

Upon their arrival home, they went to their mothers with the dead boy’s hands, and with their hair cut in the shape of a war helmet to show their grief1 for Kila. When they saw their mothers they fell down before them weeping and wailing. By the language used in their wailing, Hooipoikamalanai made out that their brother either was dead, or they were wailing for their father. So in order to be sure Hooipoikamalanai and her sister asked them: “Which one of you is it that has been injured?” The sons replied: “Kila has been eaten up by a shark. Upon arriving at the place where our father’s bones were laid, we prepared them, took them on to the canoe and we started on our return. When we reached the steep cliffs, where one has to swim to get around them, our canoe got turned over and Kila was attacked by a shark and allwe could save of him were his hands which you now see.”

When the mothers heard this account of the death of Kila, Hoopoikamalanai and her sister Hinauu wailed and expressed a desire to take their own lives, their grief for their sou was so great. Hooipoikamalanai and her sister then inquired of their sons: “Where, then, are the bones of your father?” The sons replied: “We lost them in the ocean. When our canoe was overturned we all went to the rescue of Kila, and therefore the bones of our father were neglected and they disappeared.” After this Hinauu and her sister traveled around Kauai mourning for Kila, in which the common people also joined with them.

CHAPTER V. HOW KILA WAS LEFT AT WAIPIO AND HIS LIFE THERE.

WHEN Kila and his brothers arrived at Waipio, Hawaii, and his brothers saw that he was fast asleep, Umalehu ordered his younger brothers Kaialea, Kekaihawewe and Luakapalala, to launch the canoe. This order the younger brothers obeyed. After the canoe was launched the paddlers jumped aboard, first followed by the young chiefs.

While this was going on Kila heard the bumping of the canoe, so he sat up and saw that the canoe was floating in the sea. Believing that his brothers would come for him later on, he did not watch them very closely. But when he looked again he saw that the canoe was outside of the line of breakers. He then called out to them: “How about me? How about me?” Umalehu then answered back: “Wait awhile until we come back for you.” But he saw that they were to disappear beyond the point of the cliff of Maluo, and a few moments later they disappeared altogether. Kila therefore remained on the sand of Waipio.

Kila was spared through the intervention of Kaialea, Kekaihawewe and Laukapalala, who also insisted that he be left at Waipio, as it was Umalehu’s intention to kill him while they were on mid-ocean; but Kaialea and Laukapalala prevailed on their brother to take Kila to Waipio and leave him there.

After the brothers had gone, Kila remained the rest of the night in meditation, trying to comprehend the object of his brothers’ actions. Toward morning he fell into a deep sleep after sitting up most of the night. While he was asleep and the sun was rising higher and higher, he was seen by the people, who came to admire this handsome young man who was fast asleep on the sand. At last the people woke him up and asked him where he had come from and the circumstances of his arrival at this place. He then told them the whole history of his treatment by his brothers. He was then taken to the home of one of the men.

During the first part of Kila’s life in Waipio he lived under the people as a servant, doing everything he was told to do. His constant labors consisted of farming and the cooking and the preparation of the food for his masters. He lived in this lowly life for a period of about three years. At times he was told by the people with whom he was living to bring firewood from the top of the cliff, when he would climb to the top of Puaahuku. During one of his climbs to the top of this cliff, he was seen by a priest who was living in the temple of Pakaalana, by means of the constant appearance of a rainbow that hung over this cliff. Upon seeing this sign, the priest determined to find out if this sign was indeed the sign of a high chief. But he was not able to see the sign every day, however, as Kila did not always go to the top of the cliff, only doing this at certain times, when he was iu quest of firewood.

Shortly after this Kila was accused by his masters of breaking certain kapus. It was reported to his masters that he had eaten certain food that was kapued, being reserved for the gods. But Kila was entirely innocent of the charge, so in order to save himself he ran and entered the place of refuge within the temple of Pakaalana,2 a place where the violators of any kapu could be saved from punishment. As he entered the temple the priest again noticed the sign he saw on the cliff of Puaahuku. Upon seeing this the priest spoke to Kunaka, who was king of Waipio at this time and who had reigned ever since Olopana sailed for Tahiti, saying: “You must take that boy as our son. That boy is no commoner, he is a high chief.” In accordance with the words of the priest, the king obeyed and he took Kila to be his son, and gave him the name of Lena.

After he had become Kunaka’s son he was given charge of the whole of Waipio both as to the regulations of land matters and the people, whereupon he issued a proclamation ordering the people to be engaged in farming. (It was he who started the system of working so many days for the landlords out of every month, and this system has been kept up ever since, even up to the present day.) Kunaka grew very fond of his sou for his industrious qualities.

Shortly after this, during the time of Hua, when the saying, “The bones of Hua are bleached in the sun” was realized, during a spell of great drought, when a great famine was experienced over all the lands from Hawaii to Kauai, all the wet lands were parched and the crops were dried up on account of the drought, so that nothing even remained in the mountains. Waipio was the only land where the water had not dried up, and it was the only land where food was in abundance; and the people from all parts of Hawaii and as far as Maui came to this place for food. Because of this drought all the lauds from Hawaii to Kauai were without food and the people were forced to subsist on mosses and other such things. But all through the drought and famine Waipio never went without food. During this famine the people from Hawaii, Maui and other islands came to get food at Waipio.

When Kila’s brothers heard that there was food at Waipio, their grandfather and mothers made up their minds to send the boys to Waipio for food; but none of the boys were willing to go, because it was at this place that they had abandonded Kila to his fate; so they were very reluctant about going, for fear that he might see them and there would be trouble. As often as their mothers urged them to go they as often refused, and finally they told their mothers that on no condition would they think of going. Upon meeting this persistent refusal on the part of their sons, the mothers determined to ask them one by one, to see if there was not a chance to persuade one of them to go, but every one of them refused. The mothers would not have no for an answer, and kept on urging the sous till finally one of the boys, Kaialea, consented to go to Waipio to get them some food.

CHAPTER VI. KAIALEA’S TRIP TO WAIPIO AND HIS MEETING WITH KILA.

IN due course of time after setting sail for Waipio, Kaialea and his men arrived at their destination. Just prior to their arrival, however, Kila issued an order throughout the length and breadth of the land, that no one should give any food away upon pain of death. If a landlord gave away food the land would be taken away from him, and so on down the line. As Kaialea and his men were approaching land Kila recognized his double canoe and immediately made up his mind that his brothers must be on it. When the canoe was beached, Kila saw his brother. In order, therefore, to make sure that the crime committed against him was really intentional, he ordered his officers to confiscate the canoe of Kaialea.

The day on which Kaialea arrived was one of the kapu days, when no canoes ere allowed to be seen at sea, so when the people came and seized his canoe, Kaialea, took it for granted that it was because of his great crime in breaking the kapu, and he immediately remembered his mother’s as well as his brothers’ orders about not remain-

ing too long on Hawaii, so he wondered how he was to fulfill their wish, for his canoe had been confiscated, which left him without means of getting back to Kauai. He also thought of the needs of the people at home and of their disappointment about bis not coming back in the time allowed him. After the canoe was taken over by the officers, Kaialea and his paddlers went along with some of the people of the place. While they were at the homes of the people who befriended them they heard that the food had been kapued by the order of Kila. This was not the name by which he was known in Waipio, however. On the next day some men were sent by Kila to-come for Kaialea and take him to the king’s strong house. When Kaialea arrived in the presence of the king, he thought he recognized Kila, which made him think of death, because he reasoned within him: “I am going to be killed because we brought him here and deserted him.” But on being told that this person’s name was Lena he was greatly relieved. While he was being held in the presence of the king, he was asked: “Where did you come from and what is your business here?” Kaialea replied: “I am from Kauai, and because of the famine brought about by the drought I was sent to come to Hawaii and get us some food. This is the only reason that has brought me here. I did not know that the canoe was to be confiscated.” Then Kila, otherwise known as Lena, asked: “Didn’t you come to this place some time ago?” Kaialea thought he would not tell the truth in answering this question for fear if he should answer that he had come to Hawaii before, he would be killed, because of the boy whom they had kidnapped and killed; so he decided to answer the question in the negative, saying: “I have not been to Hawaii before this.” Before they thought of placing Kaialea in confinement, Kila bad a talk with one of his friends and instructed him in the following manner: “When Kaialea is brought here I will proceed to question him, and in case he does not answer my questions properly then I will turn him over to you and you must then make a further examination of him.” So when Kaialea denied ever coming to Hawaii before this, Kila told his friend: “Say, you must attend to this fellow and question him further on this.” The friend after looking at Kaialea asked him: “Didn’t you come to Hawaii before this? Didn’t you take a boy from Waipio with you on that occasion?” Upon hearing these questions put to him by Kila’s friend, Kaialea did not wish to speak of the deed committed by them, for he knew very well of the consequences of such deeds if known, so he denied having any knowledge of the thing, saying: “We have not been to this place before; this is the first time I have seen Waipio.” Because of this answer Kila came out with the question: “Who are your parents?” Again Kaialea resorted to falsehood and did not give the right names of his parents, for he knew by the questions put to him that if he told the truth he would be killed. When Kila heard Kaialea give other than the true names to his parents he gave his officers the following orders: “Keep this man in confinement until tomorrow, then put him on the altar and sacrifice him. This is the very man that killed Kila and left their brother in mid-ocean. Don’t bind him with ropes, however, but let him have free access to the house until such time when I shall give further orders as to his death, when he shall indeed die.” In accordance with the king’s orders, Kaialea was taken to the kapu house and there placed in confinement, receiving good treatment and being supplied with all the food he wanted. But with all this good treatment he was not able to eat any of the food placed before him, being overcome with grief at the idea of his being put to death. It was not Kila’s wish, however, to sacrifice him, but rather to make Kaialea realize the gravity of the evil deed which they had committed against their own brother.

On the next day, the day when he was to be sacrificed, early that morning, while the prayers were being said, the note of a mud-hen was heard, when the priests all remarked: “Something is wrong; the man is saved, because something has happened to interrupt our recital of the prayer. It is too bad; we were almost at the end when everything would have been well.” During the morning the priests proceeded to inform the king of the interruption in the recital of their prayer, when Kila replied: “If the recital of your prayer has been interrupted, then the man must live; he shall not die today.” He then sent for his executioner and said: “Don’t put this man on the altar, but take him and place him in one of the other houses and take good care of him until such other time when I shall issue further orders as to his death.” So Kaialea was taken to one of the other outhouses of the king. But he did not give up the idea of being killed, because he had heard that he was to be sacrificed some day.

While Kaialea was in confinement, this time, Kila often came to ask him questions touching upon their evil deed. But Kaialea was very stubborn, so he was ordered to do all kinds of labor. A few days after this, Kila thought of his mother and aunt and the possibility of their meeting death through hunger, so he gave orders to some of his men to proceed to Kauai with food. But when these men started out they did not get as far as Kauai, they only went as far as Kaunakakai, Molokai, and there squandered all the food in adulterous living. After they had squandered all the food, they returned to Waipio and reported to Kila that they had delivered the food to his people in Kauai. Several trips were made by these same men with the purpose of going to Kauai, but they never once got that far, only going as far as Molokai in each case.

In the meantime the people on Kauai awaited Kaialea’s return. But after a long wait without hearing anything of him, Hooipoikamalanai and her sister sent a party of men to come and institute a search for him. On this voyage, the party arrived at Waipio, Hawaii. Upon their arrival they were asked why they had come, so they replied that they were in search of a chief, Kaialea by name. On learning the mission of the strangers, the Waipio people informed them that he had been condemned to be put to death. They further told the strangers that Kaialea was now in confinement in the temple, and it had been reported that he was to be sacrificed, but so far no one had seen him sacrificed, but it was possible that he bad been put to death secretly. On the other hand he might have been thrown in a deep pit.1

When the searching party heard the word death repeated, they became anxious to see the paddlers who accompanied Kaialea. Upon being told where these men were living, the searchimg party immediately set out for the place and met them. This meeting greatly relieved Kaialea’s companions and they once more entertained hopes of again setting eyes on their people at Kauai.

When they came together the circumstances of their treatment were told the late comers in the following manner: “Kaialea is dead; he is in the temple of Pakaalana. The only time we saw him was when we landed. The canoe was at that time confiscated and he was taken away from us. We have remained in this way ever since, through the charity of the people here. We have not seen the chief since our arrival. We are now relieved, however, for you have come. But the food of Waipio has been kapued.”

When Kila heard that a canoe had arrived from Kauai, he sent some of his men to bring them to him; this was done. As soon as they came into his presence they were asked: “Where did you come from?” They replied: “We have come from Kauai.” “What is the object of your voyage here?” asked Kila. They replied: “We have come in search of our chief, Kaialea. His mother and aunt have waited for a long time for his return, and because he has overstayed the time allowed him to come, we were ordered to come and look for him. Upon our arrival here we were told that he is dead, so we are going home and tell his people that the chief is dead.”

In order to make sure of this, Kila ordered his officers to arrest the men and take them to the temple of Pakaalana. So they were taken by the officers as real prisoners and were placed in confinement in the same place where Kaialea was being kept. While this was being done, there was one man left, the man in charge of the canoe. When he heard what had happened to his companions, and that they had been carried off to be killed hi the temple of Pakaalana, he hid himself in the house where they were being entertained. A short time after this he met Kaialea’s men and they decided to return secretly to Kauai. When they were ready to leave, Kaialea’s paddlers told the people who had befriended them about their going home to Kauai. Their friends, who really thought a great deal of them, asked them: “Why should you people go home?” The Kauai people answered: “We cannot stay. If we remain here we would be killed, for the king does not think kindly of us.” Their friends knew that that what they had said was quite true, so they gave their consent, being afraid of the troubles that might follow. On this same day the Waipio people pulled up some taro and loaded them uncooked onto the canoe that night, and the Kauai people set out on their return journey.

CHAPTER VII.

OF THE MEETING BETWEEN KAIALEA AND THE MEN THAT WERE SENT OUT BY HIS MOTHER, HOOIPOIKAMALAANAI.

WHEN the men who came in search of Kaialea were being taken to be placed in confinement, in the same place where he was being held, they began to have all kinds of speculation as to their probable fate. Upon arriving at the temple they were placed at a little distance from Kaialea. When he saw them his eyes were filled with tears, while he tried to control his feelings.


When the king’s officers saw him weep they went and told Kila of what they had seen; so he came to the place where Kaialea was confined and proceeded to question him: “Are you weeping?” Kaialea replied: “Yes.” Kila again asked him: What are you weeping for?” Kaialea replied: “I am weeping because I saw the people from my home.” Kila then went over to where the others were being confined and after a while he came back to Kaialea, without having spoken to the others, and again asked Kaialea: “Are you not Moikeha’s son?” Kaialea replied: “No, I am not his son. He is a chief and I am a common man.” Kila then remarked: “You shall not be released from this place until you tell me who your parents are. When you have done that, I will then allow you to return to your home. If you tell me the truth to all the questions that I shall put to you, you shall be released this very day.”

When Kaialea saw that a chance was given him to get out of his difficulties, he then told the truth. In the course of Kila’s questions, he asked him: “How many are there of you from your parents?” Kaialea replied: “There are three of us by Hooipoikamalani and Moikeha. There is one older than myself, my mother’s first-born, then myself and the one following me, Kila by name, making three by the same mother. Our father and our mother’s younger sister have two, Kekaihawewe the first-born, and Laukapalala the younger, making five of us altogether, all boys. The youngest of the lot is Kila.”

By these answers Kila saw that Kaialea had told the truth, so he proceeded to question him further: “Where is your youngest brother?” Kaialea replied: “He has gone to Tahiti; he was taken by an older brother, Laamaikahiki.” When Kila heard this he immediately gave his executive officer the following orders: “Take him and keep him in confinement in the temple of Pakaalana, because he has not spoken the truth; he says his youngest brother is in Tahiti.” In obedience to the orders of thechief, Kaialea was taken into the temple of Pakaalana. After he had been in confinement for a while, Kila again entered the temple and went and stood at the base of the altar where he could see Kaialea and said: “Keep him in confinement here until the day when the sacrifices are to be offered in this temple, when you must take him and offer him as a sacrifice on the altar.” It was not the intention to sacrifice Kaialea, but said in order to frighten him, which would probably cause him to tell the truth. Kila then gave orders to release the other men who had been confined and they returned to the home of the people who had entertained them before their arrest.

In the meantime those men who had returned secretly to Kauai, Kaialea’s paddlers and the man who had charge of the canoe, arrived there and were questioned by Hooipoikamalanai: “Where are the rest of you?” They replied: “Don’t think that our return means well; no, there is nothing to rejoice over. Kaialea is in confinement in the temple of Pakaalana, as well as some of the people that came later. They are all in confinement. We cannot speak of their fate. If they have been put to death, then they are dead by this time. If they are still living, then they live through the mercy of God.”

When Hooipoikamalanai and Hinauu heard this they were greatly distressed, and said: “This is indeed strange; evil has somehow followed close upon us. Is it possible that we are to lose a second son? It is far better for us to cross the ocean in our old age, if by doing so it would be possible for us to look on the place where the bones of our son are laid, and then die there and be laid with him. Why should we not go, then, and die there with him, since we have enjoyed life so long?”

As Hooipoikamalanai was thus determined to go to Hawaii, she and her sister took several companions along on their journey to die with Kaialea. The heads of the people who were to accompany on this journey, as well as the heads of Hooipoikamalanai and her sister, were then shaved as a sign of their grief.

Upon reaching Waipio they were informed this was the day when sacrifices were to be offered in the temple, and the day when Kaialea was to be sacrificed. As they were approaching land the people from shore saw a double canoe with its platform covered, which was a sign that a chief was aboard. At this same time Kila saw his mother and aunt and his brothers. So he gave orders that the houses be made ready to receive them. After they had landed Hooipoikamalanai and Hinauu were sent for and they were brought to the palace of Kunaka, which was near the temple of Pakaalana, while the brothers of Kila were taken to the other houses apart from their mothers.

Kila, upon seeing his mother and aunt, endeavored to conceal his feelings and went to the stream and pretended to take a swim, although it was only to hide his weeping. Hooipoikamalanai and her sister did not, however, recognize him, for he was somewhat changed and was now a full-grown man.

After Kila had had his weeping in the stream, he returned home to meet his mother and aunt, at the same time keeping himself unknown to them. Hooipoikamalanai and her sister then spoke to Kila: “We would like to have our sons brought here so that we may live together in this same place, as we do not want to have them live away from us.” The brothers were then sent for and they came and lived with their mothers in the same house. While they were all together Kila asked his mother and aunt: “Have you any children?” Hooipoikamalanai answered: “Yes, we have children. There are two of us mothers and one father. We have five children; I have three with our husband. This one, which is Umalehu, is the first-born; then his brother, Kaialea, who is now in confinement; and then the youngest, Kila, who is now dead. He was eaten up by a shark, while on an expedition to Haena with his brothers for the purpose of bringing back the bones of their father which were to be taken to Tahiti later on. I am still keeping the hands of my dead son. Hinauu here has two sons with our husband. These two whom you see here: their names are Kekaihawewe and Laukapalala. When word was brought to us that Kaialea was to be killed, we decided to come and die with him. But if you will give your consent that we die inKaialea’s stead, let him live.”

Kila replied: “Your son will surely die; he is to be sacrificed tomorrow. I have nothing more to say in the matter. I have left his life and death in the hands of the executioner.” Shortly after the above conversation took place, Kila asked his brothers: “Where is your brother Kila?” One of the boys answered: “He was eaten up by a shark, just as our mother has told you.” Upon hearing this reply the officers were ordered to arrest them and place them ia confinement in the temple where Kaialea was being kept. When this was done Hooipoikamalanai and her sister were greatly troubled because all their sous were now placed in confinement. They then said to themselves: “How much better it would have been for us had we remained at Kauai, for then all our sons would not have gotten into this trouble. It is best that we all die together now.”

On the next day Kila sent out men to call all the people of Waipio together to come and sec Kaialea and his brothers placed on the altar for sacrifice. The order given was as follows: “Come together to see the sacrifice.” It was not Kila’s intenion, however, to do this, but he was preparing to make himself known to his brothers, mother and aunt, and he was also preparing to reveal the great crime his brothers had committed against him, their brother. Furthermore, he was unable to continue being a stranger to his mother any longer, for his grief was more than he could bear.

CHAPTER VIII. HOW KILA MADE HIMSELF KNOWN TO HIS MOTHER, AUNT AND BROTHERS.

ON THE night following the day when the proclamation was issued calling the people together, the night before the day when the sacrifices were to be offered in the temple, the king and his chief priests and the people connected with the chief priests came to recite their prayers in the mua house. From the beginning of the recital of the prayers until midnight everything went off smoothly without a single hitch. After midnight and along the hours before dawn, Kunaka, Kila and the chief priest entered the kapu house and joined in the recital of the prayer called Oneoneohonua.1 Toward morning the note of a mud-hen was heard, when the chief priest immediately informed the king and Kila: “Our prayer has been interrupted. Here we are with daylight almost upon us, when the recital of the prayer would end and everything would be satisfactory. Therefore there will be no sacrifice for the altar today.” Kila, on the other hand, had known that there would be some interruption in the recital of the prayers that night, because he did not think Kaialea would be killed.

On this same morning Kila and Kunaka went out of the temple and Kila proceeded to the house where his mother and aunt were living and brought them into the temple. Just as the sun was coming up Kaialea and his brothers were brought in, all being held by the king’s officers, and were led up to the base of the altar, when Kila came and stood by the anuu2 and faced his brothers. His mother and aunt, the chiefs and all the people were gathered there.

While Kila was standing before the people, his mother stood up and spoke for herself and sister as follows: “As four of our sons are to die today, let there be eight of our people killed with them1 and the two of us, making ten.” Kila did not pay any attention to these words from his mother, as he knew that his brothers were not going to be killed. Standing on the steps of the altar, he turned and faced his brothers and said:

“I am Kila of the uplands, Kila of the lowlands, Kila-pa-Wahineikamalanai, the offspring of Moikeha. I had thought that your evil designs against me were ended, but I see you still think evil of me. You brought me and left me here while you went home secretly. I called after you, but you would not turn back. After you had gone I lived as a slave under some of the Waipio people just for the sake of my living. I obeyed all the orders given me and went out to labor in the fields, did the cooking, prepared the food and brought firewood from those cliffs, the cliffs of Puaahiiku. In this way did I labor patiently until I found a father in this person, Kunaka, when my labor for my living ended and I received my reward. I received the blessing you see me enjoying today only through my patience. All would have been well if this was the only crime committed by you. But no; you kidnapped a favorite son from this place; you killed him and took his hands and gave them to my mother and aunt and told them that they were my hands, and that I had been eaten up by a shark. As far as your treatment of me is concerned, I am able to overlook that, but your treatment of one of the favorite sons of Waipio is an act from the consequences of which I am unable to protect you, your life and death being entirely at the disposal of the parents of the boy whom you murdered.”

While Kila was making himself known, the people with whom he had labored for his living began to realize that he was a very high chief, and they repented of their actions.

After Kila had made himself known to his mother and aunt and to all the people, Hooipoikamalanai and her sister for the first time discovered the great crime committed by their sons. They then immediately ordered that their sons be forthwith placed on the altar which had been made ready for them, and that death be meted out to them as their just dues.

Upon hearing these orders Kila deferred putting his brothers to death until the next day, while he studied a way of saving them, for he well knew they would not be killed. During that night he spoke to his mother and aunt as follows: “Let Umalehu and the rest of them be saved, because by their leaving me here in Waipio you are all saved from dying of hunger. Had they thrown me into the ocean you would not have had any food. I think they ought to be saved.” When his mother and aunt heard Kila’s intentions they would not entertain them, for they had made up their mind that their sons should die.

When Kila saw that his mother and aunt were bent on seing their sons punished, they being overcome with anger, he decided to keep the matter of saving them to himself, and that he would wait until his brothers were led to the altar, when he would make the last attempt and save them. At the time that Umalehu and his brothers were about to be killed, Kila also went inside of the place of their expected death and said: “Let me die first, and my brothers after me.” When his mother and aunt saw that Kila loved his brothers more than he did himself, they gave up their determination to have their sons killed.

CHAPTER IX.

HOW HOOIPOIKAMALANAI AND HER SISTER LlVED IN WAIPIO AND THEIR RETURN TO KAUAI.

HOOIPOIKAMALANAI and her sister lived with their sons in Waipio many days after this; but when the food began to show itself above the ground in all the lands, then they returned to Kauai where Kila, his brothers and mother and aunt, made new regulations and adjustments of the land and its government. Hooipoikamalanai and her sister desired and insisted that Kila take charge and act as king of Kauai according to the wish of Moikeha. In this desire of Hooipoikamalanai and her sister they were disappointed, as Kila did not wish it to be so, but insisted that his mother and aunt should be at the head of the government, their sons to live with them as advisers, while he himself was to be independent; for, as he expressed it, he was satisfied with his own land, Waipio. When his mother and aunt saw they could not prevail on Kila to think as they did, Hooipoikamalanai and her sister acted as the rulers of Kauai until their death, while Kila returned to Waipio with Kunaka, his adopted father.

At the death of Hooipoikamalanai and Hinauu, their sous lived on after them as the joint heirs and successors of the land in the place of their mothers. At about this time Keoloewa, one of the chiefs of Kauai, rose in revolt against the sons of Moikeha, in which he became victorious, and the sons of Moikeha were thus deprived of their lands; for Keoloewa, by reason of his conquest, took all the lands to himself. Shortly after this Keoloewa set sail for Waipio, Hawaii, to urge upon Kila to come back to Kauai to be its king. Upon explaining his mission, Kunaka accepted the offer made in behalf of his adopted son, and Kila returned with Keoloewa to Kauai and assumed the position as king of Kauai with Keoloewa as his prime minister. Shortly after Kila had assumed the position of chief ruler of Kauai, Laamaikahiki arrived from Tahiti, this being his second visit to Hawaii.

LAAMAIKAHIKI’S SECOND VISIT.

After Laamaikahiki arrived at Tahiti upon his return from his first visit to Hawaii, he heard through Hawena that Moikeha had died; so he decided to come for the bones of Moikeha his father. Laamaikahiki soon after set sail for Hawaii and first appeared off the Kau coast, and by evening of the same day had his canoe moored on the beach at Kailikii. The following story is told of his arrival at Kau. Late in the evening the people of Kau heard the beating of a drum together with the notes of a kaeke1 flute, which startled them and they rushed out to see where these sounds came from. When they got outside they saw that these sounds came from aboard of a double canoe. Upon seeing this the people remarked: “It is the canoe of the god Kupulupulu. These sounds came from that canoe.” When the people heard that it was Kupulupulu’s canoe they prepared food and swine as offerings to the god. As soon as it was daylight the next day the canoe and the people on it were seen, and the people ashore cried out: “Ye makers of the sounds, here is food and swine; they are offerings for the god.”

Laamakahiki, however, did not make a long stay at Kailikii, when he again set sail, coming along the Kona coast. On this passage from Kau to Kona, Laamakahiki continued to beat the drum and play on the flute, and he was accorded the same treatment by the Kona people as was given him by the people of Kau. It was on this visit that hula dancing, accompanied by the drum, is said to have been introduced in Hawaii by Laamaikahiki.

Laamaikahiki, after receiving food and swine from the Kona people, continued on his journey to Kauai where he met his brother2 Kila and made arrangements as to the taking of the bones of Moikeha to Tahiti. Soon after these arrangements were made the bones of Moikeha were brought from Haena. On this occasion Lamaikahiki made a long visit on Kauai and occupied his time in teaching the people the art of dancing. From Kauai Laamaikahiki visited all the other islands of this group for the purpose of teaching the people the drum dance.

Soon after Laamaikahiki’s return to Kauai from his tour of the other islands, he made ready for his return to Tahiti, taking with him his brother Kila and the bonesof their father3 which were to be deposited in the mountain of Kapaahu, Moikeha’s own inheritance, where Laamaikahiki and Kila also lived until their death. Nothing more was heard of these two since that time.

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