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Story of Lonoikamakahiki.

Updated: Feb 25, 2023



Photo: Ku'ialuaopuna


Fornander collection of Hawaiian antiquities and folk-lore. Vol. 4

Author(s): Abraham Fornander

Folklore Hawaiian language

Bishop Museum Press

Pgs. 256-363 https://puke.ulukau.org/ulukau-books/?a=d&d=EBOOK-FORNANDER4.2.5.4.16.5&e=-------en-20--1--txt-txPT-----------



CAPTER I. HIS EARLY TRAINING. LONOIKAMAKAHIKI was the king of Hawaii after the death of Keawenuiaumi at a period about sixty-four generations from Wakea. Keawenuiaumi was his father and Kaihalawai was his mother. Lonoikamakahiki was born at Napoopoo, and it was at this place that he was brought up by his retainers until he was full grown. His retainers were Hauna and Loli, and Kohenemonemo the wife of the two men.

When Lonoikamakahiki was quite young, when he was just about beginning to reason for himself, he looked up one day and saw the various implements used by his father in the different games, which were hanging up in the palace; when he saw the long spear used in the game of pahe he looked at it for a long time and then asked his retainers: “What are those long things hanging up there on the side of the house?” The retainers replied: “They are pahee spears.” Lonoikamakahiki again asked them: “What are they used for?” The retainers then told him: “When two men wish to wager certain articles of value, they would proceed to the pahee grounds and upon arriving at the place they would decide first as to the wager, whether it be articles of value or pieces of land. If they do not wager these things, then they would put up other things, such as their bones, meaning their lives. After the bets are agreed on, they would then proceed to play the game of pahee. If the points to be scored in order to win the game be made fifteen, then the oue who first obtains this number of points would win and the one with the lesser points would lose; then the winner takes the articles wagered, or whatever had been placed as wagers. Sometimes the articles of value would be so great that it would take three and four houses to hold them all. But if the things wagered be their bones, then death of course would be meted out to the loser. Wagering for bones was not made very often, only when the parties entered into the merits of their skill by long and spirited arguments, each claiming to be superior to the other. That is the use of those long things you see.”

When Lonoikamakahiki heard this explanation he replied: “Those things are worthless and have very little use; the great objection I have against them is that they are used by men for the purpose of making wagers, even to the extent of their bones, on the result of their skill after heated arguments. That is the reason they are worthless.” The retainers then said: “That is what the pahee spears are used for and the reason why they are being kept by your father.”

Lonoikamakahiki again looked up and saw a round, flat stone and again asked: “What is that thing?” The retainers replied: “It is called an olohu." Lonoikamakahiki again asked: “What is it used for?” Then the retainers told him that it was used in the same way and for the same purpose as the pahee spears. At this Lonoikamakahiki replied: “Throw it away; it is also worthless.”

Again Lonoikamakahiki looked, and when he saw the sugar-cane top, used as an arrow, he asked of his retainers: “What is that?” The retainers replied: “It is an arrow made from the sugar-cane top.” Lonoikamakahiki again asked: “And what is it used for?” The retainers replied: “It is also used in games. If two or three fellows wish to play the game with the arrows they go to the playground and see who could glide his arrow on the ground the farthest. The one who can send it the farthest wins. If articles of value have been placed as wagers the winner takes them. It is used in the same way and for the same purpose as the pahee spears, and large wagers have been lost and won on the game.” Lonoikamakahiki then replied: “It, too, is worthless; you had better break it up and throw it away.”

Again Lonoikamakahiki looked up, and when he saw a wooden club he asked: “And what is that thing?” The retainers replied: “It is a wooden club.” Lonoikamakahiki again asked: “And what is its purpose?” The retainers replied: “It is an implement of war and used to kill people with. If a battle is being fought with one side opposing the other then the war club comes in use as an implement of war. When this club is used in war it can kill as many as forty people, and sometimes it will kill more people thau that.” Louoikamakahiki then said: “That thing is also without value. Its only use would be for a stick to turn over the stones in an umu.”

Again Lonoikamakahiki looked up and saw a bundle of war spears; he then asked: “What are those things?” The retainers replied: “They are also used to kill people with. In times of war when men are fighting each other these spears are used at close quarters by thrusting, and at long range by throwing, at the enemy. These spears in the hands of strong men can be thrown for some distance. If the person on the other side is of great skill he could ward off one or more spears at a time, and in that way avoid being hit.” Lonoikamakahiki then said: “Yes, those things are of some value; but the person who can skilfully ward them off is of more importance. These things of my father’s are of some value; therefore, if my navel string is still in your keeping, then tie it together with my father’s bundle of war spears.”


Lonoikamakahiki again looked, and seeing the strings of a sling hanging he asked: “What is the use of those strings hanging from the wall?” The retainers replied: “They belong to the sling.” Lonoikamakahiki again asked: “What is it used for?” The retainers replied: “A stone is placed in the opening in the middle of the sling, then the ends of the strings are brought together and held in the palm of the sling hand; then swing the sling around the head and when you think it time to let go, one of the ends of the string is released which allows the stone to fly out at the same time. Sometimes the stone would fly over forty fathoms, and if a person is struck with it the force would kill the person. It is, however, used as an implement of war.” Lonoikamakahiki then said: “That makes two things of value belonging to my father. Tie it up with the bundle of spears.” Lonoikamakahiki in this manner inquired into the use of all the things kept by his father. He denied the usefulness of everything but two, which two things he had the greatest desire to reserve for his own use.

Sometime after this, Lonoikamakahiki again visited the house where the different implements of war and games were kept, and again looked and saw the things he had ordered to be broken and destroyed still hanging in their respective places, so he returned and asked of his retainers: “I thought you two had destroyed those things that I told you to.” His two retainers answered him saying: “We cannot destroy the things belonging to your father, for he would consider it a matter sufficient to cause our death, because the war club is one of the things highly valued by your father, for it has been used in his great battles, and it has been the means of killing many of his enemies.” Lonoikamakahiki becoming very stubborn in the matter, the retainers therefore went to Keawenuiaumi and reported to him the wish of his son.

When Keawenuiaumi heard this report he was greatly surprised because of the strange wish expressed by his sou. He therefore sought out Louoikamakahiki with the intention of asking him why he wished to have these things destroyed. When Keawenuiaumi came to the place where the boy was being cared for by the retainers, he found that Louoikamakahiki was out canoe sailing with some of his other retainers. When Lonoikamakahiki returned Keawenuiaumi was waiting for him; the boy then went up to the father and sat on his lap. In order to have the matter understood by his son properly Keawenuiaumi took Lonoikamakahiki to the house where the different implements of war and games were kept, and there the father asked the son: “What do you think of these things?” meaning the implements of war and games hanging on the wall. The son replied: “These things are of no value or use. I have told those two (Hauna and Loli) to destroy them all, but to keep the bundle of spears and the sling, for they are of value.” Keawenuiaumi then said to the boy: “That is not what I think about those things. When the time comes for you to assume the care of the whole island, then you will be in a position to do as you like; you can then throw these things away if you see no use in retaining them.”

After this incident Keawenuiaumi for some time thought over the future of the boy and wondered what would become of him after he had grown up. The father said to himself: “It looks as though the boy will some day go contrary to all the laws that have heretofore governed the apportioning of lands, and I wonder what this chief will do after he has grown up.”

Sometime after this Lonoikamakahiki entered the temple with his retainers and there saw the images standing up in one of the corners, when he asked of his retainers: “Who are those persons standing there within the wall?” His parents and retainers replied: “They are not persons; they are the gods of our parents, your grand-parents.” When Lonoikamakahiki heard that the images were gods he was sore afraid and held on to his parents with all his strength, for he had been told by his playmates that ghosts were things to be avoided and feared, and he thought the images were the ghosts. Because Lonoikamakahiki held on to his parents they said to him: “You must not be afraid; what you see are not ghosts; they are the gods who own this place.” Lonoikamakahiki then asked of his parents: “What are they good for?” The parents made reply: “The reason why they are kept is this: If in case of battle one is taken captive or defeated, they offer a prayer to the gods, and then the gods will direct the person to safety. If, on the other hand, a canoe is capsized out in mid-ocean, prayers are offered to the gods and those in the canoe will be saved. If a season of famine should come, prayers are offered to the gods and the food would again appear out of the earth. These are some of the benefits why a god should be kept.” Lonoikamakahiki then said to his father, Keawenuiaumi: “That makes three things in your keeping that are of value. I will take care of these things.”

Sometime after Louoikamakahiki had outgrown his childhood days and had almost attained manhood, he began to learn the art of dodging and throwing the spear; he also learned how to box and wrestle. These things were in time mastered by him. When he became proficient in these arts of defense and of war, the teachers who had charge of his training in these matters then held the last customary ceremonies, as a sign of foretelling how he would act in life. The signs were favorable in all the different arts with one exception, that of boxing, which, not being favorable in this one thing, he was advised to eliminate this one art from the list of those he was to participate in. In other words, he was forbidden from ever going into any boxing contest. Because of this Louoikamakahiki relinquished his claims as a boxer. It was in the art of wrestling, however, that Lonoikamakahiki proved himself to be the most proficient.


CHAPTER II. HOW LONOIKAMAKAHIKI SEARCHED INTO THE MOST USEFUL THINGS.

WHEN Louoikamakahiki became older and more matured in thought he expressed a desire to know the things that would be of the most use to him, especially in the games, so he tried each one of them, as well as the different arts of warfare indulged in by his father, the things that were told him by his retainers as the things most desired.


After Lonoikamakahiki had tried these different things he was convinced that they were of no use, as he had said. The thrust and dodging spear, the sling, and the care of the god, however, were of value. He therefore made a visit around the island of Hawaii accompanied by his parents and retainers.

Hauna and his younger brother Loli, the personal attendants or retainers of Lonoikamakahiki, were prophets; they were men who paid attention strictly to the laws of the gods, and it was said that they were men who possessed supernatural powers, and that they were able to perform many miracles in the name of the god of Keawenuiaumi, and also in the name of their own god.

In this circuit of the island made by Lonoikamakahiki and his parents, upon their arrival at Hilo they made their abode at Kanokapa, a place adjoining the mouth of the Wailuku river, where lived a man by the name of Kawaamaukele, a great priest and counselor. He was a very old man, his head was wholly gray.

When Lonoikamakahiki saw the old man he was greatly surprised, because; this man was the only man that differed from the rest of the men that came in the presence of Keawenuiaumi; his hair was so long that it reached below his waist, a thing common with the high priests, however. When Lonoikamakahiki, who was sitting with his attendants, had looked at the old man for some time he asked: “Is that old man with the long hair a god?” The attendants replied: “He is not a god; he is a human being, but not of the ordinary kind; he is a counselor. He is also the high priest, higher than all the others.” Again Lonoikamakahiki asked: “What is the old man good for?” The attendants replied: “The man who is a counselor is a very great man in the court of the king; he must be a man who is skilful in language, and whatever advice he gives the king, the king will take heed. He can predict the coming of prosperity to the land and the people. That man can tell whether a common person will become rich or poor, or the chief who will become wealthy or not.”

When Lonoikamakahiki heard these remarks from one of his retainers he was greatly impressed that such a thing could be possible, that is, that the man could tell whether a chief will become rich or poor. He therefore asked of his attendants: “And will that old man be able to recognize me?” The attendants: “Yes, he will not over-look you1 and also your doings in the future.” Lonoikamakahiki again asked them: “Is there any restriction placed on that man, that is, something that will prevent young people from addressing him? And are the grown up people the only ones that are allowed to speak to him?” The attendants replied: “You are indeed privileged to address that old man. Counselors and priests are retained and cared for to be used by the chiefs.”

Because of this Lonoikamakahiki sent one of his attendants to go and bring the aged counselor, Kawaamaukele. When he came in the presence of Keawenuiaumi and Louoikamakahiki, Louoikamakahiki spoke up saying: “You have been requested to come here because I have been told that you are an old man who is learned in the things of the future and can tell whether a chief will become rich or poor; therefore I want you to make an examination of me and tell me what I am to be in the future.”



Kawaamaukele then replied: “You are going to be a wealthy chief at times, but when you reach maturity then you will become poor, in that you will be without followers; but you are going to be a brave chief.” Lonoikamakahiki then again asked him: “What profession shall I take up in order that I may become wealthy? If you know what I can take up that will be profitable as a profession, then we will take it up and you instruct me in its detail.” The priest paused for a while, thinking of what Lonoikamakahiki had asked, and then replied: “The professions that will make you famous all over the islands are that of a counselor and hoopapa. If you can be an expert in this profession of hoopapa, then you will become wealthy.” Lonoikamakahiki took to heart every word spoken by the high priest.

Sometime after this the profession of hoopapa was taken up by Lonoikamakahiki and he was educated into the different things of the profession pertaining to that portion relating to language, and after he had mastered it he in later years did become famous all over the islands. This made the third thing that Lonoikamakahiki became proficient in up to the time of his death, and he caused no end of trouble for certain chiefs.

After completing the study of hoopapa in Hilo he returned with his parents to Napoopoo, where they took up their residence and he immediately practiced his profession on his playmates, and in this manner he made practical use of it. In this way the profession of hoopapa became a favorite thing with him, making use of it day after day. After a time, however, Lonoikamakahiki began to ensnare his playmates by getting into argument with them in order to test his profession of wrangling. All the crowds of children in Kealakekua were taken up by Lonoikamakahiki and defeated. In thus making practical tests of his vocation Lonoikamakahiki, although making great headway, was at the same time unaware of his advance in his profession; but the person who had charge of his education was well aware of his skill in argument.

When Lonoikamakahiki grew to the age of maturity he took unto himself his cousin Kaikilani to be his wife. During the early part of their married life they lived in peace and happiness, and nothing occurred between them to cause any dissatisfaction. During all the time that they lived as man and wife they did not have issue; but Kaikilani had three children with Kanaloakuaana, an uncle of Kaikilani’s. When Kanaloakuaana took Kaikilani to be his wife their issue was Kalanioumi and Kealiiokalani, who were girls, and Keakealaui, a boy.

Before Keawenuiaumi died he requested Lonoikamakahiki to take the head of the government, but Louoikamakahiki did not think it proper to do so. What Lonoikamakahiki told his father was, that he did not wish to take charge of the affairs of state at that time, but to defer the time until he was able to master the arts of warfare, when he could become expert therein; then he would take charge. Because of this, Keaweuuiaumi left the whole island of Hawaii in the care of Kaikilani.’ After the death of Keawenuiaumi, Kaikilani took charge of the government. She was the first chiefess who became the ruler of the land.


After Kaikilani had assumed the care of the government, Lonoikamakahiki made a circuit of the island of Hawaii making public competitions in all the different arts of warfare mastered by him, in which he was always victorious. Word of these accomplishments of Lonoikamakahiki was in time carried to the hearing of Kanaloakuaana. When Lonoikamakahiki arrived home after making this circuit, he competed in boxing against Kanaloakuaana, for he, too, was skilful in all the arts of warfare. Kanaloakuaana did not demand this competition for any other purpose than to test for himself how proficient Lonoikamakahiki was, therefore they tried at boxing and Kanaloakuaana found that he was skilful. Kanaloakuaana then took up spear throwing as the next thing. At this Lonoikamakahiki said: “I have not studied the art of spear throwing; but what I have mastered is the art of dodging the spear.” Kanaloakuaana therefore took him at his word and did the throwing while Lonoikamakahiki did the dodging. In this trial Kanaloakuaana was satisfied that Lonoikamakahiki was indeed master of this art. The dodging of two spears at once was next taken up and again he proved himself to be proficient.

When Kanaloakuaana saw that Lonoikamakahiki was very skilful in dodging this number of spears they tried the dodging of four spears thrown at once; but these were as nothing to Lonoikamakahiki. This trial was continued until they reached ten spears. When this number of spears was reached Kanaloakuaana was certain that Lonoikamakahiki was master of more than ten spears, so he concluded to make further trials, the dodging of any number of spears at once.

In order to make this further trial Kanaloakuaana took Lonoikamakahiki to Kailua, to the sandy beach at Kaiakekua. When they came to the place, Kanaloakuaana said to Lonoikamakahiki: “I want to be positive of your great skill, hence I have brought you here for that test and to satisfy myself that you are indeed a master. We have tested you from one to ten spears, and I am sure you are skilful in the dodging of that number. There is, however, one more trial—the dodging of any number of spears. If you are proficient in this, then you are indeed expert.”

After Kanaloakuaana had spoken the above words, the people who were to throw the spears arose in front and on both sides of Lonoikamakahiki, leaving his back free. There were about thirty spearmen to throw at the same time. After the men were ready and the spears thrown it was seen that Lonoikamakahiki was not hit by a single one of them. Kanaloakuaana continued the test from thirty spears until the number had reached two times forty spears; still Lonoikamakahiki was not hit. The only time that Lonoikamakahiki was pricked was by himself with his own spear. The trials in the different arts were carried out in the most severe way until all the different arts were gone through.

CHAPTER III. WHEN LONOIKAMAKAHIKI FIRST TOOK CHARGE OF THE GOVERNMENT.

AFTER Kanaloakuaana had put Lonoikamakahiki through all the different trials of skill in the various arts of warfare, Kanaloakuaaua said to Kaikilani: “The care of the government must be given over to Lonoikamakahiki.” This was because Kana- loakuaana was satisfied that Lonoikamakahiki was well able to take charge of all things pertaining to the government. Because of this, Kaualoakuaana told Lonoikamakahiki to fill the vacancy left by Keawenuiaumi, so Lonoikamakahiki assumed control of the government. It was Lonoikamakahiki together with his wife, however, that took charge of all the lands of Hawaii, and the two were the head of the government.

After Lonoikamakahiki had ruled for some time no dissatisfaction over his administration of the affairs of the government was shown; no wars in the nature of rebellions arose, and this peaceful reign lasted for some considerable time; neither was any family trouble seen. But Kaikilani, on the other hand, was the one who fell into sin, for she took Heakekoa, the son of Kalaulipali and Uli, as her paramour without the knowledge of Lonoikamakahiki.

After a time Lonoikamakahiki formed a desire to visit Maui and to go as far as Kauai; so he took his wife Kaikilani to accompany him on this trip. When everything pertaining to the king’s journey was ready he took his canoe men and his attendant, Loli. The chief desire that actuated Lonoikamakahiki to make this journey was that he might show his skill in his favorite profession of hoopapa. Because of this fact he took with him his calabash of clothes known by the name of Kuwalawala. In this calabash, besides his apparel, were several of the things which were used by him in the profession of hoopapa. Besides this calabash he took along with him his feather kahili, Eleeleualani. This was a very large kahili.

After everything was made ready the king and his companions set out and went as far as Maui. They did not make a very lengthy stay in Maui and the king’s visit was continued to Molokai. The journey was taken to the Koolau side of the island and a stop was made at Kalaupapa. In making the stop at this place Lonoikamakahiki did not contemplate that they would remain very long, but because of the coming of a very severe storm they were detained at this place for about four mouths. While the royal party was sojourning at Kalaupapa the two whiled away most of their time playing the game of konane.

At the time when Lonoikamakahiki and his party left on their journey of sight-seeing, Heakekoa missed his lover Kaikilaui so much that he was unable to remain in Hawaii; therefore he followed Lonoikamakahiki and his party. In following them up Heakekoa first called at Maui, and, failing to find them, he continued on to Molokai and landed at Kalae, where he was informed that the royal couple were staying at Kalaupapa. Heakekoa remained at Kalae for several days with the hope of securing someone who would carry the news of his arrival to Kaikilani, but he was unable to secure a proper person.

One day, however, there arrived certain persons from Kalaupapa. When the time came for the men to make their return to Kalaupapa, Heakekoa inquired of them: “Are you people going back to Kalaupapa?” The men assented. Again Heakekoa asked: “Are not the chiefs of Hawaii staying there?” The men then told him positively, saying: “They are still there.” Heakekoa then said: “When you get to the edge of the cliff, on your return, just call out the following words: ’Say, Kaikilani, Chiefess of Puna, love has been sent you by the shady cliff, of Uli of Hea.’ If she does not make answer, then call out again these words:

‘Say, Kaikilani, Chiefess of Puna, Your lover sends you his love Of the shady cliff that stands, of Uli of Heakekoa.’

Will you thus make the call for me?”

When these people heard these words of Heakekoa they assured him that they would, and proceeded on their way home. When the men came to the top of the Kalaupapa cliff, at a point called Kaomilani, they called out in the words instructed them by Heakekoa. At the first call Kaikilani heard it coming down from the cliff, and she then knew that her lover had arrived. At this time, however, when the call was heard by Kaikilani, she was engaged in a game of konane with her husband, but in order to distract the attention of her husband as to the meaning of the call from the cliff she made some informal remark, yet in connection with the game of konane, saying: “That is won; this is on the run, the space is long, the top is falling, the blacks are indistinct; the whites have won.”

After making the calls and believing that they had not been heard by Kaikilani, the men repeated the call, saying:

“Say, Kaikilani, chiefess of Puna, Your lover sends you his love Of the shady cliff that stands, of Uli of Heakekoa.

For once Lonoikamakahiki knew that Heakekoa was the lover of Kaikilani, and from the calls he also knew that the fellow had landed at some place on Molokai.

After Lonoikamakahiki had made out the calls, he then asked of his cousin, his wife: “Say! Your lover Heakekoa sends you his love, I hear.” Kaikilani did not make answer to the question put by her husband, however, but continued in her deception, by saying: “This here is won; that is on the run, steady progress, the top is falling, the blacks are indistinct; the whites have won.” At this, Lonoikamakahiki took up the konane board and struck his wife on the head, inflicting painful wounds, but not severe enough, however, to kill her.

Because of this, the anger of Lonoikamakahiki was aroused and his mind was greatly troubled; he then made an oath that he would never again live with Kaikilani. This oath, however, he maintained within himself, not voicing it to any one. He then put her aside and refused to have anything to do with her. Because of this Kaikilani returned to Hawaii without meeting Heakekoa again, Kaikilani promising herself to have nothing more to do with Heakekoa, knowing full well that if she did she would in all likelihood be killed by Lonoikamakahiki, her husband; therefore she made up her mind to renounce Heakekoa forever.


This beating inflicted by Lonoikamakahiki on his wife was in time carried to the hearing of Kanaloakuaana, and the chiefs of Hawaii made up their minds to revolt against Lonoikamakahiki. When Kaikilani arrived on Hawaii, on her return from Molokai, she found that Kanaloakuaana together with the chiefs of Hawaii had placed guards at all the landing places of Hawaii. This was done by their orders, because they had heard that Kaikilani was almost killed by Lonoikamakahiki.

On this return Kaikilani proceeded to Napoopoo and there found that all the chiefs of Hawaii had taken everything for themselves and were in open revolt against Lonoikamakahiki. Upon seeing this, Kaikilani’s love for Lonoikamakahiki returned and she took pity on him, and was not in sympathy with the wish of Kanaloakuaana and the other chiefs. Because of this Kaikilaui began to entertain a desire to go back and make a search for Lonoikamakahiki to inform him of the open revolt of the chiefs of Hawaii. On this return of Kaikilani, Lonoikamakahiki had in the meantime continued on his journey and was on Oahu.

CHAPTER IV. THE SAILING OF LONOIKAMAKAHIKI TO OAHU—ARRIVAL OF OHAIKAWILIULA.

—LONOIKAMAKAHIKI’S CONTEST WITH KAKUHIHEWA.

AFTER Kaikilani’s return to Hawaii from Molokai, and the inclement weather had ceased, making the ocean fit for traveling, then Lonoikamakahiki set sail from Kalaupapa for Oahu, landing at Kailua in Koolaupoko. Upon the arrival of Lonoikamakahiki he found that Kakuhihewa was living at Kailua, residing at his palace.

When Lonoikamakahiki was approaching Kailua, Lanahuimihaku and his companion recognized the canoe of Keawenuiaumi, so they said to Kakuhihewa: “It is the king of Hawaii, Lonoikamakahiki.” As Kakuhihewa and the others had heard that Lonoikamakahiki was a man well versed in the arts of hoopapa, they therefore made preparations and awaited for the arrival of Lonoikamakahiki with everything ready for a contest. Upon the arrival of Lonoikamakahiki, and the double canoe was hauled ashore, the king and the baggage were taken up and carried to the palace of Kakuhihewa.

On the next day Ohaikawiliula arrived. She was a chiefess from Kauai, and because of the great cunning and learning displayed by Lonoikamakahiki he won Ohaikawiliula and was allowed the honor of entertaining her that night, thereby giving him further subjects with which to carry on in the game of hoopapa. After having won Ohaikawiliula for the one night, without ever having an idea of committing any sin with the chiefess from Kauai, only wishing to procure further subjects for his contest with Kakuhihewa, they removed themselves to the end of the house set apart for the use of Lonoikamakahiki. After they had talked of various matters Lonoikamakahiki asked of the chiefess: “When you set sail from Kauai, were you in possession of any new chant having its origin in Kauai?” Ohaikawiliula answered: “There is a chant, but it is one relating to myself.” Lonoikamakahiki again asked: “Is it a new chant?” Ohaikawiliula again replied: “Yes, it is a very late one. It has not become known in the country districts. It was chanted only in the royal court up to the time of my departure.” Lonoikamakahiki again asked her: “What is the title of the chant?” Ohaikawiliula replied: “The Mirage of Mana.” After this conversation between the two, Lonoikamakahiki began the study of the chant until dawn, by which time he had committed it to memory.

At daylight the next day Ohaikawiliula made preparation to set sail for Hawaii, where she was going to meet her future husband, Manuahi. While this preparation was going on, and the double canoe was being hauled into the sea (the chiefess had not boarded it, however), Lanahuimihaku and his companion said to Kakuhihewa: “You had better run out and ask the chiefess of Kauai for a new chant. It is possible that she knows a late chant from Kauai, then we will study it, else it will be first acquired by the king of Hawaii, Lonoikamakahiki. Ohaikawiliula will surety give her permission that it be used in honor of your name, for Lonoikamakahiki is a chief without any chant dedicated to his name.” Because of these words, spoken by Lanahuimihaku and his companion, Kakuhihewa and his servants went up to where the double canoe was moored and Kakuhihewa reached out and held the chiefess, Ohaikawiliula by the arm, then asked her: “Before setting sail from Kauai, did you not hear of a new chant belonging to Kauai?” Ohaikawiliula replied: “I have a chant.” Kakuhihewa again asked: “Is it a very late one, not heard in the country districts?” Ohaikawiliula replied: “It has not been heard in the country districts; it was used only at the royal court up to the time of my departure. It is one used in honor of my name.” Kakuhihewa again asked: “What is the title of the chant?” “It is ’The Mirage of Mana,’” replied Ohaikawiliula.

Kakuhihewa then proceeded to master the chant by giving each of his servants a line to commit to memory. After this was done, Ohaikawiliula proceeded on her way to Hawaii, while Kakuhihewa and his servants returned to the house, where the chant was connected line by line, as committed to memory by the servants, until it was mastered in whole just as given them by Ohaikawiliula.

When Kakuhihewa was being taught the chant by Ohaikawiliula, it was very considerate of her not to have informed him that she had already taught the same to Lonoikamakahiki. She did not even say a word about the matter; probably she had forgotten all about it. If she had told Kakuhihewa of teaching Lonoikamakahiki the chant it would not have been taken for a subject in the game of hoopapa that followed.

After Kakuhihewa had committed the chant to memory he and his favorites went out surf riding. Lonoikamakahiki also accompanied the king of Oahu in this outing. When it became time for Kakuhihewa to cease surfing he returned to the house with his companions. Just as soon as they reached the house Lanahuimihaku and his companion said to Kakuhihewa: “Say, Kakuhihewa, when the king of Hawaii finishes riding the surf and should send for his loin cloth and kapa, then you refuse the taking of those things, and tell him that he shall not have the loin cloth and kapa unless he is able to recite the chant that we have just learned this morning.” Kakuhihewa then, saw that the proposition spoken by Lanahuimihaku and bis companion was a good one, so he carried out the advice given him by the two men.

Lanahuimihaku and his companion were great favorites in the court of Lonoikamakahiki prior to their coming to Oahu, and they were recognized as the most important men in the presence of the king. They were well treated and accorded the highest position over all the people when Lonoikamakahiki took charge of the affairs of the government. But there came a time when the king ceased thinking so very much of them; that they were no longer his favorites. Because of this neglect they left Lonoikamakahiki and came and lived with Kakuhihewa. It was these two men that caused great trouble for Kakuhihewa and his people.

When Lonoikamakahiki returned from having his bath and stood outside of Kakuhihewa’s palace, he said to his attendant, Loli: “You go in and bring out my loin cloth and my cloak.” Because of this order of the king Loli proceeded to get these things, they being in Lonoikamakahiki’s calabash, Kawalawala, which was in the palace, in the end of the house set apart for the use of the king.

When Loli came into the house he took the calabash where the things were kept and proceeded to open it. When Kakuhihewa saw Loli uncovering the calabash he said to one of his own retainers: “You go and tell the servant of Louoikamakahiki not to take the loin cloth until he can chant the mele in honor of the king’s name.” Because of this order from Kakuhihewa the retainer went to meet Loli and said to him: “What are you doing, uncovering the calabash of your ward?” Loli replied: “I am uncovering it for the loin cloth and kapa of the king.” Kakuhihewa’s retainer then said: “You must go back without it. You cannot have the loin cloth until the chant in honor of the king’s name is recited.” Loli then returned and Lonoikamakahiki asked of him: “Where is the loin cloth?” Loli replied: “The loin cloth cannot be had. Kakuhihewa has kept me from taking it. It is only when the chant in honor of Kakuhihewa is recited that the loin cloth can be given up.” Louoikamakahiki then said: “You go back and get my loin cloth and bring it here, and if they should ask you about the chant, then ask them the title of the king’s chant.”

Loli then returned into the house and again uncovered the calabash. The retainer of Kakuhihewa again asked: “What are you doing with the calabash?” Loli replied: “I have come for the king’s loin cloth and kapa.” Kakuhihewa then spoke up: “You are very stubborn. Have you not heard that you have been ordered that only when the chant in my honor can be recited can you get the loin cloth and kapa.?” Loli then made reply: “That is just what I have told my king, but he ordered me to return here and ask for the title of your chant.” Kakuhihewa then said: “The title of the chant in honor of my name is ’The Mirage of Mana.’”

Loli was again forced to return without the loin cloth. Upon coining to Lonoikamakahiki he was asked: “What is the title of the chant in honor of the name of the king of Oahu?” The retainer Loli then told him: “He said it was ’The Mirage of Mana.’” Lonoikamakahiki then said: “You go back and bring my loin cloth. If they should again ask you, you tell them that I have said, ‘The Mirage of Mana’ is the chant in honor of the name of Lonoikamakahiki. You repeat this to them.”

At the close of their conversation, and this was the last thing said on the subject, Loli then went back into the house, the palace of Kakuhihewa, Kamoa by name. Again Loli took up the calabash and began to uncover it for the loin cloth and kapa of his king. At this Kakuhihewa again asked: “Say, Loli, why are you again uncovering the calabash belonging to your ward?” Loli made reply: “It is for the king’s loin cloth.” Kakuhihewa said: “Have you not heard that you cannot get the loin cloth until the chant in my honor is recited?” Loli replied: “I have told him that, but he replied by asking, ’What is the title of the chant of Kakuhihewa?’ I replied: ‘The. Mirage of Mana.’ He made reply: ‘Is it “The Mirage of Mana,” the chant in honor of the name of Lonoikamakahiki?’ This is the reply made by my king, and that is all.” Because of this reply made by Loli, Kakuhihewa asked of Lanahuimihaku and his companion: “Is this chant really in honor of the name of the king of Hawaii?” Lanahuimihaku and his companion replied: “It is a lie; he has no chant in honor of his name like this one. He is a chief without a chant. You must not be afraid; make a wager with him.”

CHAPTER V. THE WAGER MADE BY KAKUHIHEWA AGAINST LONOIKAMAKAHIKI.

AFTER Kakuhihewa had heard from Loli the answer given by Lonoikamakahiki, that the chant belonged to the king of Hawaii, the chant was then made the subject of a contest. After this was agreed on the two kings came together to decide on their bets. Some time was taken up in this before they agreed upon the different objects for the wager. Kakuhihewa on his side offered that portion of Oahu from Leahi point to the Kaena point as against the large feather kahili of Lonoikamakahiki, Eleeleualani. Lonoikamakahiki on his side would not agree to this, saying: “I will not wager my feather kahili for that amount of land.” Because Lonoikamakahiki refused to agree to this offer made by Kakuhihewa, Kakuhihewa again offered all the lands, in addition to the former offer, embraced within the point of Kaena to the Kaoio point at Kualoa.

Because of this last offer made by Kakuhihewa, which really meant the passing away from him of almost all the lands of Oahu, Lonoikamakahiki replied: “I will not allow my feather kahili to be wagered for the amount of land you offer.” Kakuhihewa then replied: “Since you have not agreed to my offer, make your offer then.” Lonoikamakahiki said: “I will wager my feather kahili as against the inside of this house.” Kakuhihewa then made answer: “That is agreed; here it is. You are satisfied with the inside of the house as against your kahili, while I was offering you almost all my possessions, which I had the chance of losing to you.”

After the wagers had been agreed on, the loin cloth and kapa of Lonoikamakahiki were given up at last. Kakuhihewa then said: “You recite the chant first, for you have claimed that the chant was one in honor of your name. After you have finished, then we will recite ours.” Lonoikamakahiki replied: “You people had better make the first recital, since I have claimed that you have appropriated the chant belonging to others and are claiming it your own. In this way we will ascertain positively whether the chant is yours. After you have finished, then I will make my recital.”

Because of this argument advanced by Lonoikamakahiki, Kakuhihewa agreed that they make the first recital of the chant taught them by Ohaikawiliula. Following is the chant that caused the dispute:

It is the mirage1 of Mana.

It is as though following behind.

The water is following,

The water of Kamakahou is following;

The water that is not water,

The mirage of Mana.

Like the sea is the water,

Like the water is the sea,

Like the sea is the water of Kamakahou.

The sugar-cane trash from my eating was cast away.

After I had gone beyond

I failed to recognize.

What was seen behind, again appears in front.

The Iliau has wilted in the sun

[As] the plentiful dew of the morning.

Passed are the emblems of the god of the year.

Gone to bury the dead

[On] the barren sands of Nonohili.

The coconut grove bends low seaward of Pokii,

In reverence to [the god] Makalii.

“There, that is the chant in honor of our name. Now it is your turn.” Lonoikamakahiki replied: “The chant is not yours, it is mine.” Kakuhihewa said: “We will know it is your chant, without any doubt, after you have recited it.” Lonoikamakahiki then began the recital of the chant, first taking the chant in his own name as taught him by Hauna, and at the end he added on the chant taught him by the chiefess from Kauai. Following is the chant in full:




It is the mirage1 of Mana.

It is as though following behind.

The water is following,

The water of Kamakahou is following;

The water that is not water,

The mirage of Mana.

Like the sea is the water,

Like the water is the sea,

Like the sea is the water of Kamakahou.

The sugar-cane trash from my eating was cast away.

After I had gone beyond

I failed to recognize.

What was seen behind, again appears in front.

The Iliau has wilted in the sun

[As] the plentiful dew of the morning.

Passed are the emblems of the god of the year.

Gone to bury the dead

[On] the barren sands of Nonohili.

The coconut grove bends low seaward of Pokii,

In reverence to [the god] Makal

There are ten-

There are ten of Lanai.


There are ten—

There are ten of Kanaloa Kahoolewa,

The foundation, the joining together of the isles.

They join and hug like lovers.

Scrape away, scrape away.

There is Hilo

Thatching,

Ridging;

There is your lover

Passing by.

The mouth is closed.

The hand beckons,

The eyes also beckon,

Else he will be ashamed

And weep at

The quiet cliffs.

Water is on Oahu,

It shows there above.

Kaunuohua is low

Like a crawling hill at Nihoa.

That cliff,

This cliff,

That fence of wood.

The great one there below,


He sits;

He sits, be stands,

He points, he sticks out his tongue,

Kukahaulani.

He has the eyes of a bird,

Head of a bird,

Beak of a bird.

Tongue of a bird,

Neck of a bird,

Breast of a bird,

Wing of a bird,

Body of a bird,

Leg of a bird,

Thigh of a bird,

Tail of a bird,

Knee of a bird,

Feet of a bird,

Claws of a bird,

Feathers of a bird,

Neck of a bird.

Crop of a bird,

Liver of a bird,

Intestine of a bird.

Since you are a small bird,

Out you must go

In the upland wilderness.

For such is the way you dwell in Kona.

And catch the spawn of the Ii

And carry the spawn of Keaau.


O thou Hanalei!

Hanalei, the source of the rains,

Made low from carrying such a burden,

Who has stood on the hill top

Whose shadow has reached the bottom.

They are greatly wearied by the roughness [of the sea].

Lift up the canoe,

Let the people get aboard

With the probing sticks,

With the binding ropes,

With the floaters.

Get aboard, paddle away, get on.

The canoe master is aboard;

It is Lelepahu of Hawaii;

It is the large Hawaii of Kane;

It is Hilo of Kane of Kapu;

It is Hilo with the high cliffs;

It is Ku, the Lehua-eater;

The bosom companion of Kalalea and others who dwell there.

Who dwell there.

The house stands in Kona,

The front faces Koolau,

The wall faces Tahiti.

The posts were from Halawa

In Kauhuhu of Pele, of Peue.


Molokai is tile back,

Lauai the front. What is Molokini?

Wailuku is the locality of flying clouds.

What is broad Kula?

It is open upland.

Kaluanui of Kaluanui,

It stands by the twin hills,

The palm houses2 of Kane

Which were thatched for me at Auwahi.



The potatoes of Puukamaele,

Of Kipapai, of Honokaupu,

Of the Oopu1 of Waikolu.

I am going home to partake of some food.

The kala2 shall be my fish

Until satisfied.

It is a fish sacred to my god.

Let the canoe enter

At Kaluakoi,

The barren coast of Puumomi,

At the entrance of Wailau,

Of Umipiilani.

It is the mirage of Mann;

It is as though following behind;

The water is following;

The water of Kamakahou is following;

The water that is not water,

The mirage of Mana.

Like the sea is the water,

Like the water is the sea.

The sugar-cane trash from my eating

Was cast away, left behind, forgotten.

After I had gone beyond

I failed to recognize.

What was seen behind, again appears in front.

The Iliau has wilted in the sun [As] the plentiful dew of the morning.

What was seen behind, again appears in front Of Laauhaele.

Passed are the emblems of the god of the year,

Gone to bury the dead [On] the barren sands of Nonohili.

The coconut grove bends low seaward of Pokii,

In reverence to [the god] Makalii.


One can here follow on with the portion of the chant that remains. It is also a chant in honor of the name of Lonoikamakahiki, which is the one that Lanahuimihaku heard, and it is often added to the chant taught them by Ohaikawilinla.

When Lonoikamakahiki was repeating the chant which Ohaikawiliula had taught Kakuhihewa, Kakuhihewa saw that Lonoikamakahiki knew it, so he said to Lanahuimihaku and his companion: “Say, I see that Lonoikamakahiki knows of this chant?” Lanahuimihaku and his companion replied, saying to Kakuhihewa: “Yes, we see that he does. We lived with him while in Hawaii, but he had no chant of this kind. It is possible, however, that a canoe has gone to Hawaii without touching here and the chant was carried to Hawaii in that way.”

After Kakuhihihewa was beaten by Lonoikamakahiki, Kakuhihewa ordered all the people to get out of the house and thus leave the house to Lonoikamakahiki, the king of Hawaii, who had won. When this order was given Lonoikamakahiki was standing just outside of the door with a war club in his hands. As soon as the order was given to vacate the house the men immediately proceeded to go out; but as soon as the first party started out they were killed by Lonoikamakahiki. When the people saw this the retreated back into the house for they were afraid of being put to death by Lonoikamakahiki. When Kakuhihewa saw the people coming back into the house he asked: “Why are you people coming back? Don’t you know that we have to get out and leave the house to Lonoikamakahiki?” The people replied: “Don’t you know that you made a foolish bet? Such and such persons have been killed by Lonoikamakahiki. Here you have made a wager whereby we are to be killed.”

When Kakuhihewa heard this from the people, he said to Lanahuimihaku and his companion: “Say, is this true?” Lanahuimihaku and his companion then replied:

“Yes, it is true, because when you offered to wager your lands until there remained but a very small portion of Oahu he refused and would not wager his feather kahili for all the land you offered; but he accepted instead the inside of this house. He took this offer because of yourself the king, and your people, in order to kill us. We are beaten. You had better cry out to the king for mercy, and that we be saved.” Kakuhihewa then called out: “Say, King of Hawaii, have mercy! You have won.”

When Lonoikamakahiki heard this call for mercy, together with the cries of the people, he desisted and allowed the people to get away, and in the name of his regularly accepted law, “Mercy has rendered the law useless,” he withheld his hand and would not attack the people further. This was the beginning of the many hoopapa contests of Lonoikamakahiki.

CHAPTER VI

THE SECOND, THIRD, FOURTH AND FIFTH CONTESTS, AND THE ARRIVAL OF KAIKILANI.

AFTER this defeat of Kakuhihewa by Lonoikamakahiki, Lanahuimihaku and his companion then said to Kakuhihewa: “Say, Kakuhihewa, since we have been beaten by the king of Hawaii in this contest, let this be his victory. Our idea is this: we think it a good plan that we go out fishing. It is more than possible that the king of Hawaii can be enticed to follow us out, and if he does, and he gets excited over the sport, he will surely ask us for hook, line and bait; then we will shame him, for he is a king without any knowledge of the art of fishing. If this can be done we will be able to defeat him, and you will then get his feather kahili.”

Because of this, Kakuhihewa made up his mind to agree to this proposition expressed by Lanahuimihaku and his companion, so all doubts were removed from his mind as to his ability to win the feather kahili, and being easily led by Lanahuimihaku and his companion, Kakuhihewa of course consented. It was a common thing with Kakuhihewa to give in to the wishes of the two men, for he had the most implicit confidence in them.

On the morning of the day after, Kakuhihewa and his men made ready the double canoe and set out for the fishing grounds for a day of fishing. The fishing grounds they decided to go to that day were the ones called Akaka, directly out of Kailua, at a point from which Kahiku in Koolauloa and Mokuoniki on the east of Molokai could be seen.

When Lonoikamakahiki saw Kakuhihewa setting out for the purpose of fishing, he turned and said to his retainer, Loli: “I think it a good idea that we follow Kakuhihewa and his companions and look on while the king of Oahu does his fishing.” Loli replied to his ward: “You must not urge us to follow out to watch the fishing, for if you get stubborn I will get killed, because you do not know how to fish.” To this Lonoikamakahiki said to Loli: “Why should you get killed without any cause?” The attendant replied: “Here is the reason why I shall be killed: after we get to the fishing grounds you will see Kakuhihewa and his companions hauling in the fish, and you will get excited over the sport and will have a desire to do some fishing your-self. Because of that desire you will ask for hook and line, and they will refuse and insult you with such expression as this: ‘Where have you been that you should come here unprepared?’ Therefore you will be ashamed; and this will cause my death.” Lonoikamakahiki replied: “Why should they refuse to give me hook and line? Only the ignorant will refuse to give hook and line.” The attendant said: “Yes, that would be the proper way of reasoning if things were right between you, but as things stand now they do not think well of you, for you have beaten them, and for this reason they will refuse giving you what you ask.” But with all this advice given by his attendant the king’s desire to go out was not abated; in fact, the desire became stronger, and Lonoikamakahiki finally demanded of his servant that they follow Kakuhihewa and his companions and look on while they fished.

Because of this demand made by the king, Loli therefore said to Lonoikamakahiki: “Where art thou? Since you have become stubborn about going fishing, I want you to bear in mind what I have to say to you. After we come up to Kakuhihewa and his companions, and you should wish to do some fishing yourself after seeing Kakuhihewa haul out several fish, and if you should ask for hook and line and they should refuse and insult you, then you must kill me, take out my intestine and use it for a line, and my thigh bone for your hook; then take my flesh and use it for your bait, and my head you can use as a sinker; then lower the whole thing into the sea and, after giving a jerk, call out in my name as follows: ‘Say, Loli! Say, Loli, the fish without eyes!! Catch a fish for us, Loli.’ Then you will hook an ahi.” After giving Lonoikamakahiki these instructions they proceeded out to sea.

A FEW WORDS OF EXPLANATION RELATING TO LOLI AND HAUNA.

In the first chapter of this story of Lonoikamakahiki the character of these two men, Loli and Hauna, is there told. Hauna and Loli were men who faithfully followed their religious rites and were true worshippers of the god of Keawenuiaumi, which was left in charge of Lonoikamakahiki.

These two men were famous throughout the whole group because of their great supernatural powers and because of their great respect of their god, and by this respect it was supposed that they were able to perform many miracles in the name of the god of Keawenuiaumi. It was because of this great power that Loli was able to see the future and so instructed his king Lonoikamakahiki to kill him in order to obtain line, hook and bait.

HOW LONOIKAMAKAHIKI FOLLOWED TO SEE KAKUHIHEWA AND HIS COMPANIONS FISH.

Lonoikamakahiki and his companions in due time caught up with Kakuhihewa’s canoe and together they arrived at the same fishing grounds; but Lonoikamakahiki, contrary to all rules about fishing, kept on going until his double canoe stood directly at the bow of Kakuhihewa’s double canoe, where he cast off the rock that served as his anchor. This rock was a very small one for the purpose, but to prove the supernatural powers of Hauna it served the purpose as an anchor, although a strong gale came up and for a short time it blew quite fiercely. When the storm was blowing, the rock that served as an anchor for the double canoe of Kakuhihewa was unable to hold the canoe and so it was carried off to the leeward of the fishing grounds for some distance. The double canoe of Lonoikamakahiki, however, never moved a bit, and the small rock held it as though a large anchor had been used. This was because of the supernatural powers of Hauna.

When Kakuhihewa saw how the double canoe of the king of Hawaii was held by the small mooring rock he expressed the desire of possessing it, so he immediately made up his mind to name the rock in his next wager with Lonoikamakahiki.

While Lonoikamakahiki and his companions were floating in the same place Kakuhihewa said to Lanahuimihaku and his companion: “What a wonderful rock the king of Hawaii must have.” Lanahuimihaku and his companion replied: “Yes, we know of the rock that serves as the anchor of the double canoe of the king of Hawaii. We have seen several rocks like that.” Because of this answer given by Lanahuimihaku and his companion, Kakuhihewa thought he would send for one like it from Hawaii, but Lanahuimihaku and his companion said: “You cannot make use of that kind of rock, however, because your attendants do not possess supernatural powers. That rock holds that canoe because of the supernatural powers of Hauna.”

When Lonoikamakahiki and his companions were moored directly at the bow of the double canoe of Kakuhihewa, Kakuhihewa was sore displeased, for he knew that such a thing was not considered right by all fishermen. This displeasure was so strong that he spoke of the matter and remarked that he did not at all like the way Lonoikamakahiki’s double canoe was moored. But Lanahuimihaku and his companion, however, said: “Don’t at all mind it. If the king of Hawaii has any fishing implements with him then it would be wrong.” This reply satisfied Kakuhihewa for he thought no more of the matter.

While Kakuhihewa and Lanahuimihaku and his companion were talking, Kakuhihewa felt a fish tugging at his hook, so he said to Lanahuimihaku and his companion: “Say, I have caught a fish. What can it be?” Lanahuimihaku and his companion said: “It must be an ulua. Ask the king of Hawaii what it is.” Because of this, Kakuhihewa called out: “There you are! Say, King of Hawaii, what kind of a fish have I caught?” Loli said to Lonoikamakahiki: “Tell him that it is a shark.” Lonoikamakahiki therefore replied as directed by Loli, saying: “It is a shark.”

Because Lonoikamakahiki had named the fish to be a shark Kakuhihewa asked of Lanahuimihaku and his companion: “Is it a shark?” Lanahuimihaku and his companion replied: “It is not a shark. The king of Hawaii deceives himself. Here we have been fishing on these grounds many times and we never have caught a single shark. Yon also know that these fishing grounds have been dedicated to our god and no shark can come here. Make a wager with him. You will for the first time beat the king of Hawaii now.”

Because of these words of Lanahuimihaku and his companion, Kakuhihewa said to Lonoikamakahiki: “Say, King of Hawaii, we had better make a wager. If it is a shark you beat us; but if the fish I hold should prove to be an ulua, then we beat you.” Lonoikamakahiki replied: “What shall our wagers be?” Kakuhihewa said: “From Leahi to the Kaena point, I will place against your mooring rock.” Lonoikamakahiki replied: “It is a bet.” Kakuhihewa then pulled on his line and when the fish was almost to the surface, Kakuhihewa said to Lanahuimihaku and his companion: “It is a shark. We have lost to the king of Hawaii.” Lanahuimihaku and his companion then looked down and when they saw it was a shark they nodded to Kakuhihewa to let go the line so as to allow the shark to break away and in that way get rid of it before the others could see it. But Lonoikamakahiki had seen the nod and at once saw the intention of Kakuhihewa and his companions to allow the fish to break away from the line; so he called out to Kakuhihewa and the others: “Say, King of Oahu, don’t play false and allow the fish to get away by letting go of the line. If you don’t see the shark, pull it in to be certain.” Kakuhihewa was therefore forced to pull on the line and after a while they all saw plainly that it was a shark. Because of this Kakuhihewa said to Lonoikamakahiki: “You have won. It was because we were certain that no sharks came to these fishing grounds that we made the wager with you.”

It was a well-known fact that no sharks were caught on these fishing grounds, as the place was dedicated to the gods, hence no sharks were supposed to get there, as the gods had charge of the place; but by the supernatural powers of Loli and Hauna, the fishing grounds known to be without sharks became a place infested with them. Having won the wager, Kakuhihewa lost to Lonoikamakahiki that portion of Oahu from Leahi to Kaena point, which became the property of Lonoikamakahiki.

After this had taken place the desire to take a hand at fishing overcame Lonoikamakahiki, so he said to Kakuhihewa: “Say, King of Oahu, let me have a hook, line and some bait and also a sinker.” Kakuhihewa replied: “Why did you not come prepared when you came out to fish? Did you suppose that we were to supply you with these things necessary for a fisherman?” Loli, the attendant, then said: “My king, you have been shamed. This is what I expected and therefore warned you that we had better not come out. Now, therefore, you must kill me.”

In obedience to the former instructions of his attendant, Lonoikamakahiki proceeded to kill Loli and to make use of the different parts for his fishing apparatus, then lowered the whole thing into the sea. He then called the words taught him by Loli, saying: “Say, Loli! Say, Loli, the fish without eyes of the sea!! Catch us a fish, Loli.” At that very moment, as soon as the last word was spoken, an ahi bit his hook. As soon as he felt the bite Lonoikamakahiki called out: “Say, Kakuhihewa, what kind of a fish have I caught?” Kakuhihewa hesitated for a while, then asked of Lanahuimihaku and his companion: “What kind of a fish has the king of Hawaii caught?” Lanahuimihaku and his companion replied: “Name it a shark, because the first fish caught being a shark there must be a lot of them down below.” Because of this, and


in accordance with the words of Lanahuimihaku and his companion, he answered Lonoikamakahiki, saying: “It is a shark.” Lonoikamakahiki answered back: “No, you are mistaken, King of Oahu.” Kakuhihewa then asked Lonoikamakahiki: “And what do you say it is?” Lonoikamakahikt replied: “This is not a shark, it is an ahi.”

Because of this reply made by Lonoikamakahiki, Kakuhihewa therefore asked of Lanahuimihaku and his companion: “Is the fish caught by the king of Hawaii really an ahi?” Lanahuimihaku and his companion replied: “The king of Hawaii is deceiving us. Don’t you know that everybody knows that no ahi can be caught in Oahu, and that such fish can only be caught at Niihau and Hawaii fishing stations? Make a wager with him.” Kakuhihewa then called out: “Say, King of Hawaii, let us settle on a wager then. From the Kaena point to the Kaoio point as against your mooring rock.” Lonoikamakahiki replied: “It is a bet.”

As soon as the wager was settled Lonoikamakahiki pulled on the line and when the fish was almost to the surface he allowed it to pull away directly below the double canoe of Kakuhihewa and his companions. At this time Kakuhihewa and his men made out that the fish caught by Lonoikamakahiki was an ahi. As the fish was plainly seen Lanahuimihaku and his companion said to Kakuhihewa: “We are beaten by the king of Hawaii, for here it is; the fish is really an ahi.”

When the fish came up to the side of the canoe of Lonoikamakahiki, Lonoikamakahiki took a wreath of lehua blossoms and a wreath of hala, which had been made ready beforehand for this purpose, and put them around the gills of the fish, and then called out to Kakuhihewa: “Say, King of Oahu, this fish must have come all the way from Hawaii, for it is the yellow-gilled ahi of Umulau, for it is wearing wreaths of hala and of lehua.”

When Kakuhihewa heard these words of Lonoikamakahiki he, as well as those with him, was surprised and therefore asked of Lanahuimihaku and his companion, saying: “Do you two know that the ahi of Hawaii wear wreaths of lehua and hala?” Lanahuimihaku and his companion replied: “The king of Hawaii is deceiving us. Make another wager.”

In obedience to this Kakuhihewa therefore called out: “Say, King of Hawaii, let us make a wager. From the Kaoio point to Mokapu I will place against your mooring rock.” Lonoikamakahiki replied: “It is a bet.” As soon as the bet was made the stern of the double canoe of Lonoikamakahiki was turned toward the double canoe of Kakuhihewa, the fish was then made fast and Lonoikamakahiki showed the wreaths to Kakuhihewa, so that he was beaten.

After Kakuhihewa had been beaten, Lanahuimihaku and his companion said to Kakuhihewa: “We have been beaten in all our wagers, and the island of Oahu is almost wholly gone. Now, therefore, we had better do this: let us wager the rest of island, from Mokapu to Leahi, as against the mooring rock, and let us have a canoe race. The canoe that will reach dry land first shall be the winner. If the king of Hawaii should agree to this then we will surely win, because he has but two rowers.”

Because of these words of Lanahuimihaku and his companion Kakuhihewa called out: “Say, King of Hawaii, let us make another wager for the rest of the island.”

Lonoikamakahiki then asked: “What shall we do?” Kakuhihewa replied: “Let us have a canoe race. Let the double canoe that will reach dry land first be the winner, and let that portion of the island of Oahu that is left be placed against your mooring rock.” Lonoikamakahiki replied: “It is a bet.” After the bets had been made, Lonoikamakahiki said to Kakuhihewa: “You had better go on ahead.” When Lanahuimihaku and his companion heard Lonoikamakahiki ask of Kakuhihewa to proceed on ahead, they urged Kakuhihewa to order the rowers to go ahead. The order was therefore given and they started off.

After Kakuhihewa and his companions had started Lonoikamakahiki ordered his rowers to partake of some food. The men then took some food. By this time Kakuhihewa and his companions were almost out of sight. When they finished their meal Lonoikamakahiki ordered his rowers, Kaiehu and Kapahi, to row away. At the order the men began to row, taking the Koolauloa way and by way of Kona and then on in toward Waimanalo. After going for some time Kakuhihewa and his men laid to and awaited for the approach of Lonoikamakahiki, thinking that when they came up nearer they would then make land.

While they were waiting, Lonoikamakahiki, on the other hand, was coming inside of the Waimanalo reef and was almost at Kailua. When Lonoikamakahiki and his men were about to get to the landing place Kakuhihewa for the first time caught sight of them, so he said to Lanahuimihaku and his companion: “I want you two to look and see what double canoe that is that is entering the landing place.” Lanahuimihaku and his companion then looked and said: “That canoe is Lonoikamakahiki’s, We are beaten.” Kakuhihewa theu said to Lanahuimihaku and his companion: “Where did they come from?” Lanahuimihaku and his companion replied: “They must have come by way of Koolau, then by way of Waianae and Kona.” Kakuhihewa said: “I thought you said that we were to win this race; but here it is we are beaten. You two are indeed strange. Here the whole of the island is gone, all through your advice, which I have always obeyed. Now my kingdom is lost to Lonoikamakahiki.” Lanahuimihaku and his companion replied: “We were made bold to make a request for a canoe race with the king of Hawaii because we saw we have sixteen rowers while the king of Hawaii has but two.” When Kakuhihewa lost this last wager he lost the whole of the island of Oahu to Lonoikamakahiki.

After this last wager Kakuhihewa wagered his daughter with the expectation of winning back his lands. The game they played, however, was the game of konane. Kakuhihewa was an expert at the game; in fact this was the one thing in which he excelled in all the games he had made a study of, and knowing this Kakuhihewa challenged Lonoikamakahiki. This challenge Lonoikamakahiki accepted. Lonoikamakahiki, on the other hand, was not an expert in the game of konane, for the only time he played the game was when they were staying at Kalaupapa, where he played with his cousin, his wife.

After the bets had been made the stones were placed in position. Lonoikamakahiki then said to Kakuhihewa: “You make the first move.” Kakuhihewa therefore made the first move, and Lonoikamakahiki followed with the next. Kakuhihewa made

another move, and Lonoikamakahiki made his. Kakuhihewa made several moves and so did Lonoikamakahiki. After this Lonoikamakahiki had his own way with the game. Of course Kakuhihewa was beaten in the first game, but since they had agreed before the start that two games must be won before the winner can claim the wager, the stones were again placed on the board and Lonoikamakahiki made the first move. In this second game Lonoikamakahiki proved to be the best player, and the game was almost won when it was stopped because of the arrival of Kaikilani at. Kailua from Hawaii.

When the people saw a double canoe approaching they mentioned the fact and Lonoikamakahiki looked up and saw that it was Kaikilani, but not wanting to see her, in order to live up to the law laid down by him while in Molokai, after he had beaten Kaikilani, he therefore kept his face down onto the board so that he would not see her.

Kaikilani, on the other hand, when she came ashore approached the wall surrounding the house and on coming to the railing she saw Lonoikamakahiki playing konane, with his face turned toward the inside of the house. Upon seeing Lonoikamakahiki, Kaikilani recited the chant in his honor, similar to the one that appears in Chapter V. The chant was recited by her as follows:

Kahikahonua to Elekaukama,

Halalakauluonae,

Nanamakaikaeleua,

Mahehaluakama,

Laloia, Laloae Kama.

Cling perseveringly to the breast

Of Kukulu of Halaaniani,

Falling hither, falling thither,

falling in the time of Kama,

Kapapaokalewa Kama,

The base of Kuami

Paepaeilani

Kekupuaiawaawa

In the time of Hakiawihi Kama

Hakekoai, O Lono.

Opuukahonua, Kamakalewa,

Noiaku Kamahuaola,

Peu and Kiha,

The base of Kama,

Haena and Koenamimi.

Young is the offspring of Lonokaeho.


Who art thou ?

It is Kakaeke,

Hanakaeke,

Nanakaeke,

Paakaeke,

Maakaeke.

That is the bag that will bring fame,

That is the bag, the bag of—


They join and hug like lovers.

Scrape away, scrape away.

There is Hilo

Thatching,

Ridging;

There is your lover

Passing by.

The mouth is closed,

The hand beckons,

The eyes also beckon,

Else he will be ashamed

And weep at

The quiet cliffs.

Water is on Oahu,

It shows there above.

Kaunuohua is low

Like a crawling hill at Nihoa.

That cliff,

This cliff,

That fence of wood.

The great one there below,


He sits;

He sits, he stands,

He points, he sticks out his tongue,

Kukahaulani.

He has the eyes of a bird,

Head of a bird,

Beak of a bird,

Tongue of a bird,

Neck of a bird,

Breast of a bird,

Wing of a bird,

Body of a bird,

Leg of a bird,

Thigh of a bird,

Tail of a bird,

Knee of a bird,

Feet of a bird,

Claws of a bird,

Feathers of a bird,

Neck of a bird,

Crop of a bird,

Liver of a bird,

Intestine of a bird.

Since you are a small bird,

Out you must go

In the upland wilderness,

For such a the way you dwell in Kona.

And catch the spawn of the Ii

And carry the spawn of Keaau.

O thou Hanalei!

Hanalei, the source of the rains,

Made low from carrying such a burden,

Who has stood on the hill top

Whose shadow has reached the bottom.

They are greatly wearied by the roughness [of the sea].

Lift up the canoe,

Get aboard, paddle away, get on.

Let the people get aboard

With the sounding sticks,

With the binding ropes,

With the floaters.

The canoe master is aboard;

It is Lelepahu of Hawaii;

It is the large Hawaii of Kane;

It is Hilo of Kane of Kapu;

It is Hilo with the high cliffs;

It is Ku, the Lehua-eater;

The bosom companion of Kalalea and others

Who dwell there.

The house stands in Kona,

The front faces Koolau,

The wall faces Tahiti.

The posts were from Halawa

In Kauhuhu of Pele, of Peue.

Molokai is the back,

Lanai the front,

Molokini the thatching ropes.

Wailuku is the source of the flying clouds.

It is a broad plain where councils are held.

The ridging is Lanakila.

Kaluanui of Kaluanui,

It stands by the twin hills,

The palm houses of Kane

Which were thatched for me at Auwahi.

The potatoes of Puukamaele,

Of Kipapai, of Honokaupu,

Of the Oopu of Waikolu.

I am going home to partake of some food.

The kala shall be my fish

Until satisfied.

It is a fish sacred to my god.

Let the canoe enter

At Kaluakoi,

The barren coast of Puumomi,

At the entrance of Wailau,

Of Umipiilani,

It is the mirage of Mana;

It is as though following behind;

The water is following;

The water of Kamakahou is following;

The water that is not water,

The water of Mana.

Like the sea is the water,

Like the water is the sea.

The sugar-cane trash from my eating

Was cast away, left behind, forgotten.

After I had gone beyond

I failed to recognize.

What was seen behind, again appears in front.

The iliau has wilted in the sun

[As] the plentiful dew of the morning.

What was seen behind, again appears in front Of Laauhaele.


Passed are the emblems of the god of the year,

Gone to bury the dead

[On] the barren sands of Nonohili.

The coconut grove bends low seaward of Pokii,

In reverence to [the god] Makalii.


Dearly I love the icy waters of Malama.

Lonoikamakahiki is growing.

It is Kamakahikikaiakea

Of the plain of Kohala of Wakiu,

Of Lanikaula,

My isle of the sea.


Say, Lono,

I have recognized your back;

I have sung to you; the hearing,

The seeing is yours. Say, Lono,

Turn to me.1

At the close of Kaikilani’s call or chant in honor of the name of Lonoikamakahiki he turned around and pretended as though it was the first time he had seen his cousin who had been standing outside of the enclosure. At sight of her, Lonoikamakahiki could scarcely contain himself, and his love for her was such that, try as he would, he could not withhold his tears; he was, however, able to refrain from crying-out aloud.

As his cousin had chanted in honor of his name, it was for him to respond by chanting her name; but being unable to recall the chant at that time he looked steadily at Lanahuimihaku and his companion, for he knew that these two men were familiar with the chant, and knowing this Lonoikamakahiki looked at them with the hope that they would realize his inability to recite the chant and they do it for him. But Lanahuimihaku and his companion, however, did not wish to come to his assistance, for they were supporters of Kakuhihewa.

After a time, however, the first four lines of Kaikilani’s chant came to his memory, and together with a few lines which he picked up Lonoikamakahiki chanted the following response to the chant in his honor:

My cliff of lehua at Kilou,

My land of lehua there below.

My man of lehua on the cliff,

Lehua of my land.

You must tell the others

That I am your cousin.



Yes—. Yes—. Yes—.

I was at that hill,

I was at this hill,

Muss up your apparel.

The cliff of lehua looked on

As I was jumping down.

When Kakuhihewa heard Lonoikamakahiki’s response to the name of his cousin, Kakuhihewa remarked: “Lonoikamakahiki is chanting somebody else’s name instead of his own.” Lonoikamakahiki replied: “It is done. I am going to recite it, but I must first weep with the stranger.”



Kaikilani then came in and kissed Lonoikamakahiki and they wept. Seeing that Kakuhihewa was constantly urging Lonoikamakahiki to chant the name of Lonoikamakahiki, she asked of Lonoikamakahiki: “What is it that they are constantly urging you to do?” Lonoikamakahiki replied: “They are telling me to chant my name, because Lanahuimihaku and his companion have said that I am a chief without a chant in honor of my name.” Kaikilani then said: “Let us cease weeping and do as they request.” Lonoikamakahiki then faced about and recited to the people the chant in honor of his name, while Kaikilani joined him. The chant is the one already related above.

At the close of the chant by Lonoikamakahiki and Kaikilani, Lonoikamakahiki then said to Lanahuimihaku and his companion: “You two men are the worst of any I have known. If during my visit here I shall get a hold of this island of Oahu, I will cut you to pieces while alive.

CHAPTER VII.

THE DISPUTE BETWEEN KAKUHIHEWA AND LONOIKAMAKAHIKI ABOUT

HAUNA.

The dispute between the king of Oahu and the king of Hawaii which ended in a contest, spoken of in this chapter, was the last one engaged in by the two, after which Lonoikamakahiki and Kaikilani returned together to Hawaii.

The cause of this dispute was entirely about Hauna. It came about in this wise: After Lonoikamakahiki had acquired Oahu through their former contests, Kakuhihewa begged of Lonoikamakahiki to restore to him the island of Oahu, going about it in a way as though he still owned the island, saying: “Say, King of Hawaii, I think you had better restore back to me the lands you have won and let our former wagers be done away with. I think you ought to propose another contest between us, and in case you should beat me in the new contest then the whole of Oahu shall be yours, including the men of high rank and those of the low rank.”

This request for a new contest, made by Kakuhihewa, was really the wish of Lanahuimihaku and his companion, for they had heard the remark made by Lonoikamakahiki that they would be put to death by being cut to pieces. This is the reason why Lanahuimihaku and his companion had urged Kakuhihewa to beg of Lonoikamakahiki for a new contest. To this request made by Kakuhihewa, Lonoikamakahiki did not give a subject for their contest.

Shortly after this, however, Lonoikamakahiki took up his calabash, which contained his personal effects as well as other things, and placed it in front of him, and then said to Kakuhihewa: “Say, King of Oahu, this calabash is filled with the bones of the chiefs who were killed in the battle on the top of Puumaneo, because there were six district chiefs that were slain by my father and their bones are in this calabash.” Kakuhihewa upon hearing this said: “How you: deceive! Who has taught you that that calabash could ever hold the bones of six chiefs?” “Lonoikamakahiki said: “I say it. Tomorrow my foster-father Hauna will arrive and he will tell you people about the matter.” Kakuhihewa then said to him: “And who has brought you word that Hauna is to arrive tomorrow?” Lonoikamakahiki replied: “I, myself, say so because of my knowledge.” Kakuhihewa then asked of Lanahuimihaku and his companion: “Say, are the words spoken by the king of Hawaii true, that he can see the future and that Hauna is to arrive tomorrow?” Lanahuimihaku replied: “It is a lie; he has no knowledge of the future. We were the two men who were able to tell him of the future from the time of his father, and this Hauna, who is living on Hawaii, and the attendant whom he killed when we were out fishing were the only men who could tell of the future; but the king there knows nothing at all about the matter.” Kakuhihewa then again asked: “Is it true that Hauna is going to arrive here tomorrow?” Lanahuimihaku and his companion replied: “It is not true. Make a wager with him.”

Kakuhihewa then said to Lonoikamakahiki: “Say, King of Hawaii, since we have at last found a subject for another contest—the matter of the arrival of Hauna tomorrow—let us, therefore, have one.” Lonoikamakahiki replied: “What have you to offer as your wager? A good contest can only be made when one has something to place as a wager.” Kakuhihewa said: “Why not let Oahu be offered as against Hawaii?” Lonoikamakahiki made answer: “When you know that I have already won Oahu you come and again offer it for a wager.” Kakuhihewa said: “You must put away such thoughts, King of Hawaii. It was the small Oahu that we wagered before, and large Oahu is still my own.” Lonoikamakahiki then replied: “It is well, then. The stakes are the island districts. Oahu containing six districts and Hawaii also containing six.” After this bet was made and agreed on, that night Hauna arrived in Kailua, and so the next morning Lonoikamakahiki said to Kakuhihewa: “Hauna has arrived on Oahu.”

When Kakuhihewa heard these words from Lonoikamakahiki, he sent out his messenger, Kuleonui, a man famous for being a very fast runner, and told him: “You must go around Oahu and look for Hauna. When you find him, kill him, and seize all his property, so that we may be able to defeat the king of Hawaii.” At this Kuleonui started on his trip around the island of Oahu; but he was unable to find Hauna. He therefore returned and reported to Kakuhihewa, saying: “I have made a circuit of Oahu but was unable to find Hauna. He has not arrived even, nor is there a canoe to be seen at sea coming this way, nor is there one hauled up on the shore; none at all.” At this Kakuhihewa began to think that he would beat Lonoikamakahiki. Kakuhihewa then went to Lonoikamakahiki and again asked him: “Has Hauna arrived?” Lonoikamakahiki replied: “He has arrived.”

When Kakuhihewa heard this from Lonoikamakahiki, he again sent Kuleonui to make another circuit of Oahu. Again Kuleonui started out and returned to the king to whom he reported, saying: “I have not found him. He has not even arrived,” repeating what he said at the other time.

But, on the first circuit made by Kuleonui on that day, Hauna had already arrived in Kailua and was playing konane with a couple of women when Kuleonui came by, and was recognized by Hauna as a person out looking for some one, by the way he was glancing around. By this, Hauna knew that Kuleonui was a messenger and was able to conceal his identity and was in this way missed by the sharp eyes of the messenger of Kakuhihewa. A FEW WORDS ABOUT HAUNA. While Hauna was living on Hawaii he thought he would come in search of Lonoikamakahiki, so he therefore made ready his personal effects and placed them in his canoes. The chief articles of value that Hauna placed on the canoes, however, were a large number of feather cloaks. The canoes were loaded from stem to stern with these articles. These were the only things in the canoes. On this voyage from Hawaii he made land at Kailua, where he saw a couple of women playing konane with their husbands. When Hauna saw the game he knew at once by the position of the stones that the men were beaten, so he said to the women: “You two are beaten, providing I was to play you women. I know I can beat you two.” The women replied: “Here is the konane board, go ahead and play.” Hauna said: “Let us delay the game for a while until the messenger of Kakuhihewa passes by; after he passes we will continue with the game. We must, however, cover up the board with a piece of kapa; after that we can discuss as to our wagers, and when that is settled we will begin.” After Kuleonui had passed the place the bet was discussed and agreed on in the following manner: the women said to Hauna: “We have nothing to offer on our side excepting ourselves. If you beat us in this present unfinished game you can take us as your property.” Hauna then said: "I have two double canoes filled with things that are valuable; the chief articles of value on the canoes, however, are a large number of feather cloaks. If you two beat me, you two shall have the goods in the canoes together with the men on board.” The women replied: “It is a bet.” Hauna then said: “Let me make the first move.” It was a fact that before the game was continued, and before the bets were settled and the board covered with the piece of kapa, Hauna knew very well that he was beaten; but upon seeing Kuleonui it gave him an excuse to propose that the board be covered over until the messenger of Kakuhihewa passed by. According to his request the board was covered over. But when the kapa was removed, in order to continue the game, Hauna caught up some of the stones which gave the women the best advantage with the kapa. Hauna then made the first move and after a few more moves the women were beaten. At this he said: “I have won you two.” The women replied: “We have husbands of our own and we cannot see how we can straighten out this difficulty.” The husbands of the two women replied: “You two had better not consider us, because you made your own bet and have lost it yourselves.” The husbands then said to Hauna: “You can take the women as your own property, for you have won them; they were not staked by others; they made the bet themselves.”

314 Fornander Collection of Hawaiian Folk-lore. Because of this Hauna took the women and tied them together with a loin cloth and led them to the place where the canoes were lying. Because these women were led by Hauna, the place where this act took place was given the name of Kaohao and it so remains to this day. The place is in Kailua, Koolaupoko, Oahu. The women were taken by Hauua to the canoes where he said to one of them: “This canoe shall be yours with everything in it from stem to stern, including the men. The men shall be your servants; they are not for you to sleep with. And as he had spoken to her, so in like manner he spoke to the second woman. He then left the women and proceeded to meet Lonoikamakahiki. CHAPTER VIII. HOW LONOIKAMAKAHIKI REVEALED THE BONES OF THE CHIEFS KILLED BY KEAWENUIAUMI. WHEN Hauna went up to meet Lonoikamakahiki, Lonoikamakahiki said to him:If you had not arrived this day I would have been cooked in the umu, for it is now ready.” Hauna replied: "You have won. Show them the bones of the chiefs killed in the battle in the time of your father, Keawenuiaumi. At that moment Hauna reached for the bones of the chief of Kohala, which were plaited with feathers and fastened together by netting,1 and said to Lonoikamakahiki: “Here is the chief Palahalaha, the chief of Kohala, son of Wohilani.2 He had been residing with us, and seeing how few we were, left, and at your father's battle ou Puu maneo3 died at our hands. We secured the bones and put them away in the gourd container.” At this time Lonoikamakahiki seized them and threw them in front of Kakuhihewa and began chanting: Level indeed Lies Kohala, Face down. The fragrance is waited to me Of the flower of Koolau, of Moolau. Low indeed lies Puakea, With Kukuipahu by its side. Here are some more! As this bundle which Lonoikamakahiki threw reached Kakuhihewa he said to Lanahuimihaku and others: “Who is this?” Lauahuimihaku and the others said: “This is Palahalaha, the chief of Kohala, the son of Wohilani. He resided with Keawenuiaumi, and seeing how few we were, left, and at the battle of Keawenuiaumi on Puumaneo we slew him. He was also a younger brother (cousin) of Keawenuiaumi. Kohala is a beautiful country and is a large district.” Then Hauna again spoke to Lonoikamakahiki: “Here is another chief, and also a younger brother (cousin) of your father’s. He also resided with us, and learning how few we were, left us and fought on the side of the rebels expecting that we would be vanquished, and at our battle on Puumaneo we killed him and stripped his bones and put them away in the gourd.”

Lonoikamakahiki, having heard of these facts, took the bones of the chief of Hamakua, which were plaited with feathers similar to those of the chief of Kohala, and held them in his hands and, before throwing them before Kakuhihewa, began to chant:

You have one, jump in; You have two, jump in. They go here and there. The men in the rain. The plovers about. Listen to the raindrops of Hilo. Canst thou dare Eat in company ? Here are some more!1

Placing the calabash before Kakuhihewa he asked Lanahuimihaku: “Who is this?” They answered: “This is Pumaia, the child of Wanua who was the chief of Hamakua, also a younger brother (cousin)2 of Keawenuiaumi. He lived with us, and having learnt that we were few in number, deserted, and at our battle at Puumaneo he was slain by Keawenuiaumi. We secured his bones, put them away in a gourd, and these are the bones.”

Hauna drew out the bones of another chief from the calabash and said to Louo. ikamakahiki: “Here is another uncle (father) of yours, Hilohamakua, the chief of Hilo, child of Kulukulua, a younger brother (cousin) of your father. He also lived with us, and because there were so few of us left and joined the rebels on the other side, and at the battle fought on Puumaneo your father slew him, stripped his ones and put them in the gourd.” Then Lonoikamakahiki reached for it and chanted: That is Hilo! That is Hilo! That is Hilo of the incessant rains, The increasing rains. The ceaseless rains of Hilo. That is Hamakua of the steep cliffs. The ti leaf of Kamae is tramped down, Hamakua is indeed withered. Here are some more!

Placing the bundle in front of Kakuhihewa, he asked Lanahuimihaku and others: “Who is this?” They answered: “It is Hilohamakua, Kuluknlua’s child, the chief of Hilo, a younger brother (cousin) of Keawenuiaumi. He lived with us, and ascertaining how few we were, went away, and at the battle fought on Puumaneo was slain by Keawenuiaumi. His bones were stripped, put away in the container, and this is he.”


Thus three chiefs were accounted for, leaving three more, when Hauna spoke up: “Here is another chief, another uncle of yours, being a younger brother (cousin) of Keawenuiaumi. He resided with us, and because of our meagerness, deserted, and at the battle fought on Puumaneo he was slain by Keawenuiaumi. The bones were stripped and also put away in a gourd.”

Lonoikamakahiki then took up Lililehua, the child of Hua-a, the chief of Puna and chanted before Kakuhihewa:

Lililehua

Is drifting to Waimea,

For Molokai is storm-bound.

When the wind1 sweeps there below.

My husband then enters the house at Mana.

We two reposed at Wawaenohu

And witnessed the weeping of the deity.2

Here are some more!

This bundle was placed before Kakuhihewa, who inquired who it was. Lauahuimihaku and the others answered: “This is Lililehua, the chief of Puna, the child of Hua-a. He had a beautiful country where even the pandanus and the lehua enter the sea, being the only sweet-scented land on Hawaii. This chief had his home with us; a younger brother (cousin) of Keawenuiaumi, but knowing our numerical weakness, deserted us, and at the battle fought on Puumaneo we slew him, stripped all his bones, put them in a container, and this is he.”

Hauna again produced the bones of another chief from the gourd, the chief of Kau, and said to Lonoikamakahiki: “Here is another chief, that of Kau. He is also an uncle (father) of yours and a younger cousin (brother) of Keawenuiaumi. He also lived with us, and seeing how few we were, deserted, and at the battle of Puumaueo was slain by Keawenuiaumi. We secured his bones and put them away in the gourd.”

Lonoikamakahiki, holding the bones in his hands, chanted:

Dear is the house of Milo in the sun, The elevated house of Moauauli. Your skin is bruised without cause, Bruised as though by a lover. This lover is from Haualei, My lover of the awa leaf of Puna. Kapaa is like the kalukalu3 mats, Where the ohai4 turns at Papiohuli. Here are some more!

Lonoikamakahiki tossed the bones to Kakuhihewa and asked of Lanahuimihaku and others: “Who is this?” Lanahnimihaku and the others answered: “This is Kahalemilo, the child of Imaikalani, the chief of Kau. He was also a younger brother (cousin) to Keawenuiaumi, and he was also one of those who resided with us, and finding out how few we were, left us and took to fighting us on Puumaneo, but he was also slain, and this is he.”

Hauna again produced the bones of the chief of Kona and said to Lonoikamaka. hiki: “Here is another chief, Moihala, the child of Heapae, the chief of Kona. He was also a younger brother (cousin) of your father. He lived with us, and because we were few, deserted and went elsewhere; he rebelled against Keawenuiaumi, and at your father’s battle on Puumaneo was also slain, the bones stripped and put into the gourd.”

Lonoikamakahiki, holding the bones in his hands, chanted thus:

This is Moihala,

Inquiring of the wind,

The bird of Kuolohia.

Waialeale, the mountain,

Waialeale, the mountain.

Kawaikini is flowing,

Of Kane in the calm.

I, the lover, shall follow

To Waialua where I leave her,

Leave her in the home of friends.

It was there I found friends,

Where I may visit.

Here are some more!

Lonoikamakahiki threw the bones in front of Kakuhihewa, who inquired of Lanahuimihaku and the others who it was. They answered: “This is Moihala, the chief of Kona, a large division of Hawaii. Moihala was also a younger brother (cousin) of Keawenuiaumi. He resided with us, and finding out how few we were, left, went to the opposite side, a rebel. He thought by rebelling he would be safe, but when putting in an appearance at our battle at Puumaneo he was slain by Keawenuiaumi.”

After the final production made by Lonoikamakahiki of the bones of the chief of Kona, Lonoikamakahiki conquered the whole of Oahu.

Following this incident, Lonoikamakahiki spoke to Kaikilani: “Inasmuch as we have made the circuit of Oahu, you, of us, had better remain; it is good laud, with inhabitants both large and small.” Kaikilani answered: “It is agreeable to me; but we had better go to put Hawaii on a satisfactory basis, then return again to Oahu. There are the chiefs of Hawaii; they have rebelled and have confiscated everything. As for yourself, upon arriving at Hawaii, wage battle, as the men have been thickly arrayed from Anaehoomalu to the front of Kauhola.”

Because of this remark of Kaikilani, Lonoikamakahiki had the canoes prepared immediately and departed. On this voyage Lonoikamakahiki did not touch at Kohala but proceeded on to Kealakekua. Upon arrival there with his men, the chiefs of Koua and the men were all at Kohala awaiting the arrival of Lonoikamakahiki there to be slaughtered by them. Upon Lonoikamakahiki’s arrival he sent a messenger to Kau to get Pupuakea to come to meet his elder brother (Louoikamakahiki) to consult concerning putting to an end the rebellious chiefs of Hawaii.

After Pupuakea arrived, they held a council of war and a decision was arrived at. Pupuakea then sent a messenger calling upon all the men to come to do battle. Kau was the only district which had not rebelled, because Pupnakea took up his residence there after Lonoikamakahiki departed for Oahu. The men having been informed, came over by the upper part of Kau to upper Kona, but the messenger that was sent reached Kealakekua, where Lonoikamakahiki and Pupnakea were living.

After receiving the information that the men had come overland, Lonoikamakahiki and Pupuakea went to intercept them at Puanahulu, and that was the place where the men were arrayed in battle formation. About this time, however, the rebels who were down at Anaehoomalu observed that the clinkers at Puuanahulu were red with people, which was a matter of surprise to the rebels. Some of them thought there was a battle being fought, while others conjectured they were some of their own men, being under the impression that Lonoikamakahiki was still at Oahu, for no news had been received that he, Loiioikamakahiki, had arrived at Kealakekua.

During the night of the day on which the rebels were surprised, Lonoikamakahiki and his younger brother Pupuakea, together with the men, came down prepared to give battle. On the night the men left Puuanahulu to go down, the rebels realized there was to be war, because there were in the hands of the men torches burning from the van to the rear of the war procession of Lonoikamakahiki. Then it was that the rebels made preparations for battle, sending out messengers to inform the men and the chiefs on their side that had been stationed from Anaehoomalu to distant Kohala.

While Lonoikamakahiki was on his way down he first met the rebels at Wailea and the fighting immediately commenced. Lonoikamakahiki was victorious on this occasion and the rebels were annihilated. This was the battle fought by Lonoikamakahiki, where it is said that blood flowed like water at Wainanalii, and hence the battle is described as that of Kaheawai.

CHAPTER IX. BATTLES OF LONOIKAMAKAHIKI.

EARLY in the morning after the battle of Lonoikamakahiki at Kaheawai, he was observed by the rebels proceeding along the lava bed of Kaniku. The rebels after reluming to camp reported to their general, Kanaloapulehu, saying: “Louoikamakahiki and Pupuakea are approaching, some men have been slain, and we (the rebels) have been routed.”

Kanaloapulehu commanded Kanaloakuakawaiea, the chief of Hilo: “Let the battle be at Kaunooa where there is plenty of sand, and let it be fought there, so that when Lonoikamakahiki reaches the spot we would be in possession of the sand, so that whilst rubbing their eyes the rocks will fly and victory will be ours.”

According to the instructions of Kanaloapulehu to Kanaloakuakawaiea, the men were placed in position at Kaunooa. This is a place midway between Puako and Kawaihae. At the noon hour Lonoikamakahiki came in contact with the rebels and the battle commenced in earnest and he was victorious over them, having repulsed Kanaloapulehu and his followers just as the shades of evening were falling.

While Kanaloapulehu and his followers were fleeing they met the Kohala and the Hamakua rebels at a place called Nakikiaianihau. Kanaloapulehu commanded them, saying: “Let us go back and encamp at Haleokapuni, and let some of us go on to Puukohola, and when Lonoikamakahiki is seen approaching Nakikiaianihau, then we will occupy Puukohola so we can shower rocks from above and Lonoikamakahiki’s battle will be a defeat.” All the chiefs observed the commands of the general and encamped at Haleokapuni immediately below the temple of Puukohola1 and Mailekini at Kawaihae. Lonoikamakahiki, however, did not manoeuver as was anticipated by the rebels.

After Lonoikamakahiki became victorious at the battle of Kaunooa he consulted his priests (kahunas) as to what steps best to take in order to lead to victory. The priests directed him to proceed by way of Pili until they came to Puupa, “and there a big battle should be fought, because thus far we have only fought against the Konas, and know nothing about Hilo and Puna, nor of Hamakua. Pay no heed to Kohala, it is a small district; let us fight her last. Proceed against the triplets, Puna, Hilo and Hamakua.”

Lonoikamakahiki followed the directions of his priests.2 Proceeding upwards from Kaunooa and about midway of the plains at about midnight they could see the fires of the rebels at Puupa. Lonoikamakahiki asked his priests: "What is that fire?" The priests answered: “A battle. It is the fires of the traitors of the land.” He asked again: "What of us?" The kahunas answered: “Send along forty men with torches in their hands, each man to carry four torches to burn, so as to deceive and to give the rebels the impression that there are four forty men, allowing them to proceed directly and when immediately outside of Puupa permit them to light their torches so we may be able to locate the whereabouts of the enemy and learn where they are eucamped, the battle to begin at once, we to follow them from the rear and the forty from the opposite direction, and the enemy will be routed.”

Receiving the instructions from the priests, Lonoikamakahiki sent out forty men with Pupuakea, who made forty-one. They followed the instructions of the priests, each man carrying four torches, proceeding along the direction indicated by the priests. They travelled along to the outskirts of the camp of the rebels, lighted their four forty torches and set up a tremendous shouting, “Onto the traitors of the laud! Onto the traitors of the land !” and such like.

The rebels saw the burning torches and heard the loud yells. After first counting the number of torches and discovering there were only four forties the rebels gave chase. While the rebels were absent Lonoikamakahiki and his men arrived, and in the fight with Pupuakea’s men, who gained by repulsing the rebels, Lonoikamakahiki and his army stood off ready to receive them. The battle waxed fierce and hard until the two divisions of Lonoikamakahiki and Pupuakea came together, when there was great slaughter of the rebels. Some escaping, ran upwards to Ouli at Waimea that night and were there slaiu by their own men being under the impression that they were Lonoikamakahiki’s men running away. Thereby the remaining rebels who escaped from the battle of Puupa were also killed. It is for this reason that this fight of Lonoikamakahiki’s was called Puupa, and was the third of his battles.

On the day following the night of battle at Puupa, rumors began to spread every where that Lonoikamakahiki was at Puupa. Those who were encamped at Haleoka puni iu Kawaihae, in accordance with a previous understanding had by them, would not ascend Puukohola unless a man on the side of Lonoikamakahiki should be slaiu; then only would Puukohola be scaled for human sacrifices. For that reason the rebels rested with high hopes, based on their former understanding and anticipations of victory, because Kanaloapulehu and Kanaloakuakawaiea were celebrated for their great prowess.

On the night following Lonoikamakahiki arrived at Kawaihae with his force of men, and Pupuakea’s force came by way of Nakikiauihau, and revealed themselves. Kanaloapulehu, seeing the force of Pupuakea, sent out four hundred men to give him battle. At the same time that the men were on the way to intercept Pupuakea, Lonoikamakahiki had taken possession of Puukohola by a strategic move made during the night and was occupying the top of it. Immediately the battle commenced, and Kanaloapulehu was afterwards made prisoner by Lonoikamakahiki’s warriors, and Kaualoakuakawaiea was repulsed with what was remaining of the rebels, Lonoikamakahiki being the victor that night, recording the fourth night battle won by him.

This battle of Lonoikamakahiki at Puukohola was named the Kawaluna, because of the night strategy successfully executed by him on that occasion. Kanaloapulehu, having been made prisoner, was killed and laid upon the altar (lele). So died the general of the rebels.

CHAPTER X.

DEFEAT OF KANALOAKUKAWAIEA AND THE REBELS.—LONOIKAMAKAHIKI’S VICTORY.

AFTER the victory by Lonoikamakahiki at the battle of Puukohola and the repulse of Kanaloakuakawaiea, the remaining great general of the traitors was forced to the top of Puainako. That eminence is about four miles to the north of Kawaihae.

On the night of the battle of Puukohola, including the following morning, after having pursued the men (Kanaloapulehu’s) from Puukohola, Lonoikaniakahiki’s warriors commenced moving. Pupuakea and his men, however, had already arrived at the precipice of Honokoa during the darkness of early morning with the intention of capturing prisoners, but none were captured, however. So Pupuakea returned and met Lonoikamakahiki descending at Pahonu. The two divisions of Pupuakea and Lonoikamakahiki were then brought together again. They then held a consultation as to the direction they should take. Pupuakea and Lonoikamakahiki desired to go by way of Waimea, but the wish of the priest, Hauna, was to proceed by the Kohala route to Puumaneo and there make preparation for battle. Lonoikamakahiki heeded the advice of the priest. Having come to that understanding they proceeded from Kawaihae until they reached the precipice of Honokoa, and reached on to the Kohala side. At that moment Lonoikamakahiki noticed the footprints of the rebels, and the victors began to search for more traces and they were innumerable, as indicated by the withered pili grass. Lonoikamakahiki’s forces followed the trodden path and lo! there were the rebels in large numbers encamped at Puainako. The rebels having first seen the forces of approaching men made their escape in every direction. However, before the final understanding had been reached at Puhaukole, Pupuakea already had dispatched a messenger to investigate the condition of the rebels who were repulsed at the battle of Puukohola.

During the progress of Lonoikamakahiki’s search they came across the messenger which had been previously sent out, who reported that the vanquished were fleeing over the pili grass. The conquerors gave chase, meeting them on the beach at Kahua, when Pupnakea slaughtered them on the pili grass as well as at the beach, their repulse having scattered them in every direction. As for Kanaloakuakawaiea, he fled to the canoe landing and ordered the men to cover him with pebbles; the covering was only partial, however. Lonoikamakahiki and his men soon arrived upon the scene and Kanaloakuakawaiea was there slain.

When the men of Hilo heard that their chief was killed, they also offered themselves to be slaiu with him. The victors slaughtered a large number of them. Some of them scrambled over the clinkers along the beach at Kahua, like shrimps clinging to the rocks in a stream. Then it was that Pupuakea chanted: Routed, are you, indeed you are routed !1

Beaten, are you, indeed you are beaten!

You treasonable laud pirates;

You are scattered about, are you.

Like water shrimps,

Onto the rocks in the stream.

You were routed sometime ago,

For the battle was like a freshet,

The battle in the shower of sand at Kaunooa,

The night battle at Puupa.

In the general war at Kawaluna

The land pirates were easily defeated,

Merely by the wind from the war clubs.2

Men are sacrificed indeed, by Lono.

It was a victory.

Lono was victorious.

You treasonable chiefs!

This battle of Lonoikamakahiki’s was called Kaiopae, and the landing place was named after this battle and is known as such to this day.

After the defeat at Kaiopae, victory continued to follow even into Kohala. Upon their arrival there the rebels were in a state of preparedness for war at Hinaka hua, in Kapaau of Kohala. The rebels observed the victors approaching on the high lands in inferior numbers, and because of the enemy’s numerical weakness, mustered courage to give battle to the forces of Lonoikamakahiki; but upon the near approach of the conquerors the rebels fled without any apparent reason, slaughtering each other in their confusion, fleeing to hide themselves among the precipices of Pololu and Honokane.

The rebels, however, were overtaken at Halelua and slaughtered by Pupuakea with his war club. Kaiopihi, the Kohala general was slaiu, and Lonoikamakahiki once more was victorious at this battle. This battle of Lonoikamakahiki was named Kaiopihi after the incident of the death of Kaiopihi at that place, the locality being known by that name to this day.

After this battle Lonoikamakahiki rendezvoused at the upper part of Pololu at the top of the knoll of Puumaneo, where the battle was fought as directed by Hauna, his guardian priest. While located on Puumaneo, reinforcements of rebels from Hamakua, Hilo, Puna and Kona arrived. Lonoikamakahiki gained a complete victory, and there it was that all the rebellious chiefs were slaughtered, not one escaping death. Thus Lonoikamakahiki came into control of the whole of Hawaii.

After this signal victory Lonoikamakahiki went to observe religious service at the temple at Apuakohau, and it is there that the temple called Muleilua is located. After this dedication he proceeded and held another ceremony at Puukohola. Having performed his duties at this place he went on, and at Kahaluu, in Kona, again held a dedication sen-ice at the temple of Makolea. On the way Kapulani, a rebel chief, was caught hiding in the valley by the victors. It had been previously reported that he was one of the chiefs who rebelled against Lonoikamakahiki, and because of that fact Kapulani was condemned to die. On the night that the council was held the intention was to place him on the altar the following morning, but during the night he was assisted to escape by Kalanioumi1 when he, Kapulani, made his way to Kau safe from the clutches of the victors.

CHAPTER XI. THE DEPARTURE OF LONOIKAMAKAHIKI FOR MAUI TO VISIT KAMALALAWALU.

SUBSEQUENT to the slaughter of the chiefs of Hawaii by Lonoikamakahiki he consulted his wife Kaikilani for the purpose of going to Maui on a visit to Kamalalawalu. They decided, and so did all the chiefs, to allow them to go, in consequence of some plans Lonoikamakahiki had in view. On the day he was prepared to sail to Maui he selected a sufficient number of men, including his strongest and best-known warriors. He also selected his younger brother Pupuakea, well known as the premier and general, to accompany the party. On this voyage of Lonoikamakahiki he did not forget Hauna in his capacity as priest and counselor.

The following is the tradition of Lonoikamakahiki concerning this voyage: On Lonoikamakahiki’s arrival at Maui, Kamalalawalu was residing at Hana on the ahupuaa called Wananalua. When Lonoikamakahiki went ashore at the canoe landing of Punahoa he was observed by Kamalalawalu, Lonoikamakahiki and his retinue being sent for and taken to Kamalalawalu’s royal residence, it being the first time he had cast eyes on the king of Hawaii, although he had previously heard of him. It was said that Kamalalawalu was an uncle of Lonoikamakahiki.

A few days thereafter, it being customary at the royal residences of those times to drink awa, it came to pass that Kamalalawalu wanted the pleasure of drinking awa with Lonoikamakahiki, so he said to Lonoikamakahiki: “It is my pleasure that we drink awa.” In compliance with the wish of the king of Maui the king of Hawaii in like manner gave his assent.

Kamalalawalu said to Lonoikamakahiki: “Let us go surf riding and by the time we return the awa will be ready.” They went. Before going, however, they decided that they would have a chicken as an accompanying dish to go with their awa, and gave directions to their younger brothers to prepare the awa and the extra dish before they returned from their surfing.

The side dish they desired to have with the awa they were to drink was chicken. Before Lonoikamakahiki started to surf he spoke to Pupuakea thus: “I’m going iu surfing now with the king of Maui. You cook the chicken in blood1 and let it be ready when we return from surfing.” After giving these directions to his younger brother, he proceeded with Kamalalawalu to surf. As for Kamalalawalu, he also had given his younger brother Makakuikalani the same instructions as Lonoikamakahiki gave to Pupuakea. These instructions of the kings were each given to their brothers separate, apart and distinct from each other and not in the hearing of each other. Their majesties then went surfing. Makakuikalani prepared the chicken and awa for Kamalalawalu. The chicken cooked in blood and the awa masticated he awaited the return of the king.

As for Pupuakea, however, he made no preparations as he was directed to, for the reason he knew not how to prepare chicken nor how to properly chew the awa, being unaccustomed to such things. It was a surprise to Pupuakea himself that Lonoikamakahiki should have ordered him to do so, knowing full well that he (Pupuakea) was not accustomed to preparing chickens.

On the return of their majesties from surfing, Kamalalawalu was ready for his meal. He inquired of Makakuikalani if it was ready, and he answered: “It is; the chicken is cooked and the awa is masticated.” So Kamalalawalu commanded: “Have the food served.” Preparations for the meal were made, the awa being strained at the order given for preparation. Lonoikamakahiki after having returned from surfing said to Pupuakea: “Preparations are being made for Kamalalawalu’s food. Where is my awa and chicken? Have you prepared them?” When Pupuakea was spoken to he was en gaged playing konane. Upon hearing these inquiries of Lonoikamakahiki, Pupuakea. replied: “No,” and said furthermore: “The chicken is here somewhere, not killed, nor has the awa been chewed, because you well know I have no knowledge of how to prepare the things you directed me to do.”

Lonoikamakahiki became angered, picked up the konane board and struck Pupuakea across the forehead making the blood flow. Because of this, Pupuakea was angered. Instantly he reached for the charcoal and firewood, started the fire, caught the chicken and choked it and tore away one of its legs. After having it skinned he broiled it over a fire at the same time reaching for the awa root. While the chicken was being broiled the awa was being chewed; with three quids1 of the awa the legs of the chicken were cooked, the awa strained and the cooked chicken legs placed on a platter. The awa cup was placed in front of the king, and also all the other things according to the directions given to Pupuakea. He said to the king: “The chicken and the awa are ready; it only awaits you to eat and to drink of the same.” When Lonoikamakahiki saw that the instructions he gave previous to surfing had been carried out, he ate before Kamalalawalu drank his awa.

While Pupuakea was preparing the chicken, Kamalalawalu took particular notice of the peculiar manner in which Pupuakea was doing it and rather admired the manner in which it was being done.

After partaking of the awa and finishing their meal, the kings played konane, and during the game Kamalalawalu said to Lonoikamakahiki: “Say, I rather like your servant. Should you go home, let your sen-ant remain with me.” Lonoikamakahiki replied: “He is not a servant of mine, he is my notable and younger brother. Yon can not have him.” Therefore Kamalalawalu said: “If he is your notable and your general also, then I say to you, it is a low shelf which the rats will get at.”2 Lonoikamakahiki retorted: “He is a small maika that can cover a long course.”

After Lonoikamakahiki had finished talking, Kamalalawalu, pointing to Makakuikalani, said: “There is my notable, my general, and my younger brother also.”

Because Kamalalawalu ridiculed Lonoikamakahiki’s general, Pupuakea, Lonoikamakahiki, referring to Kamalalawalu’s statement, “This my notable,” remarked: “He is hollow; the swirl of the war club would stagger him; a touch of the club would kill him.” In consequence of this remark of Lonoikamakahiki, Kamalalawalu replied: “He is the shrivelled banana of Kaea, which will not ripen in ten days.”

The passage of words between Lonoikamakahiki and Kamalalawalu were treasured and stored up within themselves. After a considerable time following the events narrated, and subsequent to the return of Lonoikamakahiki from his tour, Kamalalawalu entertained the idea to destroy by war the chiefs of Hawaii in consequence of reports having been brought of Lonoikamakahiki’s strength and his success in war.

Kamalalawalu dispatched his own child Kauhiokalani, otherwise known as Kauhiakama, for Hawaii instructing him thus: “You go to learn the number of people there are on Hawaii, and on your return report to me.”

In accordance with the wish of Kamalalawalu, Kauhiokalani, otherwise known as Kauhiakama, sailed for Hawaii. He arrived at Kohala at a lauding place for canoes known as Puakea. Having arrived there, the canoes were put ashore and he began his itinerary along the coast of Kohala until he reached Kawaihae. On his journey he found very few people.


Kauhiakama thence travelled on from there to Kona Kapalilua, at the boundary of Kan and Kona, not meeting many people. He continued on until he made the circuit of Hawaii, without seeing a great many people. At Kapaau, Kohala, on his homeward journey, there was congregated a large concourse of people at the athletic grounds called Hinakahua, it being customary for the people to gather together at this place tor athletic contests. Kauhiakama remarked: “I thought Hawaii had more people, but not so; it is only noted as being a large island, but as to the inhabitants there are very few. If the people on the route of my travel were only as numerically large as the people of this place, it would be something, but I find it is not so.” Kauhiakama, having observed the population of Kohala during this circuit, returned to Maui. Upon arrival there, Kamalalawalu asked him: “How is Hawaii?” Kauhiakama replied: “Kohala is depopulated; the people are only at the beach, because during my circuit of Hawaii I did not find a large number of them. I first arrived at Kohala, then traveled along its shore until Kawaihae was reached and did not meet a solitary man. At the place of my landing, however, I met a few, not exceeding forty, perhaps, and at Kawaihae there were some places with few men. I proceeded from Kawaihae through Kona to a part of Kau, all the way not meeting mauy people. That is the most desolate place, composed of nothing but clinkers. I continued my circuit from Kau to Puna, Hilo and Hamakua. I do not recollect coming in contact with three four hundred (1200) men. On my way to Kohala I found it to be the only locality which contained some people. Kohala is depopulated; the people are only at the beach.” Kamalalawalu having heard this report from his son Kauhiakama ordered Makakuikalani to make preparations for war. It has been mentioned in this narrative that two men came from Hawaii who urged Kamalalawalu to give battle to Hawaii, being Kauhipaewa and Kihapaewa, the sons of Kumaikeau and another. According to the old historians it was Lonoikamakahiki himself who sent these two men to urge Kamalalawalu to go to war with Hawaii. And this is the story told concerning the two men. Because of Lonoikamakahiki’s intense desire to wage battle with Kamalalawalu, the former sent Kanhipaewa and Kihapaewa to consult Kamalalawalu concerning it. These two men arrived before Kamalalawalu without the latter knowing that they were emissaries from Lonoikamakahiki. On the occasion of the two men meeting Kamalalawalu, they remarked: “Go and make war on Hawaii, as you can take it if you give battle, because Lonoikamakahiki has no power, nor has his general either.” Because of the remarks of these two men to Kamalalawalu, he harbored the idea of going to Hawaii to wage war. The following is said by some of the ancient historians to be the correct narrative: Because of Lonoikamakahiki’s desire to test the strength of their two generals, putting into effect the compliments exchanged between them at the time of the awa drinking both Kihapea and Kauhipea said to Kamalalawalu: “If you should sail for Hawaii to give battle to Lonoikamakahiki, let us carry on the war from the top of Puuoaoaka and Hokuula. Let us occupy these places first; we will then possess the stones1 on the heights and compel Lonoikamakahiki to do his fighting from below; we, being above, would only have to roll the rocks and thus will the people of Hawaii be defeated by those of Maui.”

So said these men to Kamalalawalu, which was nothing more nor less than deception, expressed so as to bring about Kamalalawalu’s destruction. It was only by such means that Kamalalawalu's high ambitions were aroused to wage war against Lonoikamakahiki.

CHAPTER XII.

THE RETURN OF KAUHIPAEWA TO HAWAII.—KAMALALAWALU SAILS FOR HAWAII.

AFTER Kauhipaewa and his companion made their final statement to Kamalalawalu concerning war they immediately returned to Hawaii. Upon their arrival at Hawaii, Lonoikamakahiki was then residing at Puako, awaiting the return of Kauhi- paewa and his companion. Upon their arrival the king inquired as to their mission. They made report as to conversations had with Kamalalawalu. Lonoikamakahiki then made preparations for war, so as to be ready when Kamalalawalu made his appearance. After Kauhipaewa and his companion had departed for Hawaii Kamalalawalu made preparations to sail thither for war.

Laniknula observed that preparations were being made to sail to Hawaii to wage war on Lonoikamakahiki, so said to Kamalalawalu: “Where are you? Preparing these canoes of yours to go where?” Kamalalawalu replied: “To sail to fight Lonoikamakahiki.” Lanikaula replied: “You will not defeat Lonoikamakahiki, because no amount of strength will ever overcome Lonoikaniakahiki, for the reason that you are a human being and he a god.” Kamalalawalu made answer: “Kauhiakama says Kohala is depopulated; the people are only at the beach.” To this remark of Knmalalawalu, Lanikaula replied: “You sent your son Kauhiakama to investigate as to how many people there were on Hawaii. He returned and made his report to you that there were not many people there, but Kauhiakama did not see the number of people in Kohala because he traveled on the seashore, reaching Kona from Kawaihae and arrived on the heights of Huehue. He could not have seen the people of that locality because there were only clinkers there, having proceeded along by way of Kona until he arrived at Kau. If he had traveled along the Kona route in the early morning he could not have met people at that time because the inhabitants of that section had gone to the uplands and some had gone fishing; those remaining home were only the feeble and sick, therefore the people of Kona could not have been seen by Kauhiakama on his tour. Had he gone during the evening he would surely have seen the large population of Kona because it is the largest district of Hawaii.”

These observations of Lanikaula did not make much of an impression on Kamalalawalu. He still inclined to the idea of war. Lanikaula observed that Kamalalawalu was bent on going to war. He therefore spoke to Kamalalawalu again: “If you intend to go to war with Lonoikamakahiki, then your grounds should be at Anaehoomalu; and should Lonoikamakahiki come to meet you, then let the battle be fought at Pohakuloa, it being a narrow place; then you will be victorious over Hawaii.”

“Kamalalawalu answered: “You do not know, because I was distinctly told by both Kauhipaewa and Kihapaewa that our battle field should be on Hokuula and Puuoaoaka, it being a place of eminence. Lanikaula again said: "You are being deceived by the sons of Kumaikeau and others; you have been led astray, therefore listen to me, for if you heed not my admonitions I do not think that you will ever come home to Maui nei again.”

Kamalalawalu became indignant at Lanikaula’s remarks and drove him away. But Lanikaula, out of sympathy for the king, did not cease to again give him warning: “Kamalalawalu! You are very persistent to have war. This is what I have to say to you: Better hold temple services these few days before you proceed. Propitiate the gods first, then go.” But Kamalalawalu would not barken to the words of Lanikaula, therefore he ended his remarks. Makakuikalani made the preparations of the war canoes in accordance with the strict orders of Kamalalawalu.

When the canoes and the several generals, together with all the men, including the war canoes of Kamalalawalu, were ready floating in the harbor of Hamoa, Lanikaula came forth and in the presence of King Kamalalawalu and his war canoes prophesied in chant his last words to Kamalalawalu:

The red koae! The white koae!1

The koae that flies steadily on.

Mounting up like the stars.

To me the moon is low.2

It is a god,

Your god, Lono;

A god that grows and shines.

Puuiki, Puunui.

At Puuloa, at Puupoko;

At Puukahanahana,

At the doings of the god of Lono.

I,ono the small container,

Lono the large container.

Puunahe the small,

Punnahe the large.

By Hana, you swim out.

By Moe you swim in.

My popolo3 is mine own,

The popolo that grows by the wayside

Is plucked by Kaiokane,

Is watched over by Kaiowahine.

We two to Kahulikini,

Numberless,

Vast, without number, countless

Are we, O Kama.

Let us two to Anaehoomalu,

O my chief.

At the end of Lanikaula’s prophesy as made in the chant Kamalalawalu set sail with his large convoy of war canoes. It is mentioned in this tradition relative to the number of canoes of Kamalalawalu that the rear war canoes were at Hamoa, Hana, and the van at Puakea, Kohala; but at the time of this narrative the opinions of the ancients differed as to the accuracy of this. Some say that the number of canoes is greatly exaggerated.

Kamalalawalu having arrived at Hawaii, Kauhipaewa and Kihapaewa were stationed at Puako, in accordance with the wishes of Lonoikamakahiki. At the first meeting that Kamalalawalu had with Kauhipaewa and others, Kumaikeau and others (who were men from the presence of Lonoikamakahiki) said to Kamalalawalu: Carry the canoes inland; take the outriggers off so that should the Hawaii forces be defeated in battle they would not use the flotilla of Maui to escape. When they find that the outriggers have all been taken apart and the victors overtake them the slaughter will be yours." Kamalalawalu did as he was told to do by the two old men.

When Kamalalawalu arrived at Kohala, Lonoikamakahiki had his army in readiness. Kamalalawalu learning that Kanaloakuaana was still living at Waimea he concluded that his first battle should be fought with Kanaloakuaana and at Kaunooa. Kanaloakuaana was completely routed and pursued by the soldiers of Kamalalawalu, and Kauhiakama, and Kanaloakuaana was captured at Puako. At this battle the eyes of Kanaloakuaana were gouged out by the Maui forces, the eye sockets pierced by darts, and he was then killed, the eyes of Kanaloakuaaua being tatued.

Because of this action on the part of Kamalalawalu's men the landing place for the canoes at Puako was called Kamakahiwa,1 and to this day is known by that name and may ever remain so to the end of this race. Because of the perpetration of this dastardly act on Kanaloakuaana the following was composed by a writer of chants, being the middle portion of a chant called “Koauli”:

The drawing out of Kama, the ohia tree;

The letting out of Kama at Waimea,

The kin of Kanaloa.2

He was made black like the mud-hen.

The face was blackened.

Blackened was the face of Kanaloa with fire.

The face of Kanaloa,

With burning fire.

Let me scratch the face

Of Makakii.

You poked at the eyes of Kamalea,3

Makahiwa, Makalau.

The men were from Hoohila,

Of Makakaile.

The face of Makakaile the large one, the life.

Kikenui of Ewa.

At Ewa is the fish that knows man’s presence.4

The foreskin of Loe, consecrated in the presence

of Mano

The chief, heralded5 by the drum of Hawea,6

The declaration drum

Of Laamaikahiki.

This chant is dedicated to the eyes of Kanaloakuaana as indicated by the verses.

CHAPTER XIII.


The Battle at Waimea.—Conquest by Lonoikamakahiki—Defeat and Death of Kamalalawalu.

AFTER the death of Kanaloakuaana by Kamalalawaln, and in obedience to the statements of the old men for the Maui war contingent to go to Waimea and locate at Puuoaoaka and Hokuula, Kamalalawalu and his men proceeded to the locality as indicated by them. The Maui forces followed and after locating at Hokuula awaited the coming fray. On the day Kamalalawalu and his meu went up to Waimea to occupy Hokuula the two deceitful old meu at the time were with Kamalalawalu. In the early morning when Kamalalawalu awoke from sleep he beheld the men from Kona and those of Kau, Puna, Hilo, Hamakua and Kohala had also been assembled.

Kamalalawalu looked and saw that the lava from Keohe to Kaniku was one red mass. Kamalalawalu was astonished, because the day before he observed that the lava was one mass of black, but this morning it was entirely red with people. Thereupon Kamalalawalu inquired of Kumaikeau and the others why the lava was a mass of red: “What does red portend? Does it mean war?” Kumaikeau and the others replied: “Do not think the red you see is some other red and not what you assume it to be. It is not war. That red yonder is the wind. The olauniu wind of Kalahuipuaa and Puako had been blowing in the early morning and when it is very light and gentle it hugs the lava close. This olauniu wind on the lava coming in contact with the wind from Wainaualii raises a cloud of dust covering and hiding the land in the manner you saw yesterday. While cogitating to himself, Kamalalawalu concluded to drop the matter on account of the deceit of the two old men and the loss of confidence in what Kumaikeau and the others had said, for the reason that the lava continued to be strewn with people even to the time of the setting sun. During that night and including the following morning the Kona men arrived and were assigned to occupy a position from Puupa to Haleapala. The Kau and Puna warriors were stationed from Holoholoku to Waikoloa. Those of Hilo and Hamakua were located from Mahiki to Puukanikanihia, while those of Kohala guarded from Momoualoa to Waihaka.

That morning Kamalalawalu observed that the lowlands were literally covered with almost countless men. Kamalalawalu then took a survey of his own men and realized that his forces were inferior in numbers. He then spoke to Kumaikeau and the others: “Kumaikeau and the rest of you, how is this and what is that large concourse of people below?”

Kumaikeau and the others replied: “We have never seen so many people in Hawaii before. Do not think that because of their superior numbers they will escape us; they cannot, for the reason that their fighting will have to be from below. It is true they are more numerous, but being beneath we will defeat them.”

The following day, Lonoikamakahiki went over to meet Kamalalawalu to confer concerning the war.1 During their conference Kamalalawalu proposed to Lonoikamakahiki that war cease because he feared the greater forces of Lonoikamakahiki. But the proposal by Kamalalawalu for termination of the war did not meet Lonoikamakahiki’s approval. He had no intention of acquiescing, because he was greatly incensed at Kamalalawalu for the brutal manner in which he killed Kaualoakuaana. by gouging out the eyes and other brutal acts carried into execution while the latter was still alive.

Makakuikalani, however, upon hearing of Kamalalawalu’s proposal to Lonoikamakahiki to cease the war disapproved of it and said to Kamalalawalu not to have the war cease. “Onward, and stand on the altar!1 Then will it be known which of us is a full grown child.” This determination on the part of Makakuikalaui was manifested by his presence for three consecutive days before the forces of Hawaii. After the third day, the two combatting forces waged battle, Lonoikamakahiki gaining the victory over Kamalalawalu’s entire force on the same day the battle was fought, the Maui-ites being completely routed.

This is the history of the battle as related by the ancients and as the narrative is preserved by them. Before the battle commenced it was customary for the old men to encourage Kamalalawalu to do battle. Whenever the two old men heard what Kamalalawalu and the others had to say as to what they intended doing to Lonoika- makahiki in order to be victorious in battle, the old men would wend their way to make it known to Lonoikamakahiki and the others and this duty was generally carried out during some convenient time of night. The two old men always pointed out to Kamalalawalu and the others where the battle should be fought, and the suggestions of the old men were always received with the utmost confidence by him. Therefore Knmaikeau and the two deceitful old men would in turn inform Lonoikamakahiki. The two old men never suggested any place for battle which would result advantageously to Kamalalawalu and his forces; on the contrary, it was invariably such a locality where inevitable defeat would result.

In the early morning of the day of battle, Makakuikalaui went to the front with his warriors following him and planted themselves at Waikakanilua below Hokuula and Puuoaoaka at a prominence looking towards Waikoloa. Pupuakea, on observing that Makakuikalaui was placing his men and self in position, he and his warriors immediately came forward prepared to give battle. It was a case where both sides were equally prepared for the fray.

Makakuikalani was a man of great height and large physique; a renowned and powerful general of Maui and was also Kamalalawalu’s younger brother. As for Pupuakea, Hawaii’s celebrated and powerful general and who was Lonoikamakahiki’s younger brother, he was only a man of small stature. Both men had been taught the art of fighting with the wooden club and were experts in its use, but their schooling was under different masters and at different places.

On the day of battle the sight of Makakuikalani put Lonoikaniakahiki’s forces in dreadful fear. When Pupuakea saw Makakuikalani he had no fear of him, did not tremble but stood firm ready to give battle.

While Makakuikalani and Pupuakea were standing on the battle field, Makakuikalani raised his war club and from on high struck at Pupuakea. Being short in stature he was only slightly struck but fell to the ground, however. At the iustant Makakuikalani’s war club struck Pupuakea the end of it was buried deep into the ground. At the moment Pupuakea was struck by the war club and fell Makakuikalaui thought that he was killed, but the latter’s master saw that Pupuakea was not dead, so said to Makakuikalani: “Go back and slay him for your opponent is not dead. Your clubbing being from above only delivered a blow with the butt end.” Makakuikalani hearing the words of his teacher turned around and threw the butt end of his club, at the same time telling him to “Shut up! Instruction stops at home. He cannot escape, he must be dead because the club strikes true.” At the very instant that Makuikalani faced around to talk with his teacher, he (the teacher) was dead.

Pupuakea was lying on the ground, stunned, but somewhat recovered afterwards and raised himself up from the ground. When Makakuikalani saw that Pupuakea was still alive he rushed towards him bent on killing him.

Pupuakea observed Makakuikalani’s approach so prepared himself to slay him.When Makakuikalani drew near, Pupuakea raised his club and twirled it from his right. At that moment Makakuikalani attempted also to lay his club on Pupuakea, and when his club was twirled it skidded along the ground towards the feet of Makakuikalani and being parried by Makaku, fell to the ground. When Makakuikalani swung his club from the left side it struck the back of his own neck and he was instantly killed. Pupuakea immediately stepped backward and met his master who said to him: “Go back again and slay him so he be dead.” The words of his master aroused Pupuakea’s pride and he said to his teacher: “He cannot live, he is dead.” Then looking at the palm of his hand he again said to Ms master: “He cannot be alive because the birthmark of Pupuakea has impressed itself thereon. The flying club through dust has killed him.”

After the great and renowned general of Maui had fallen the Hawaii forces continued to slaughter Kamalalawalu and the others. Upon the death of Kamalalawalu the slaughter of the Mauiites continued for three days thereafter and those defeated who ran towards their canoes found no arms and outriggers because they had been broken. The repulsed warriors ran to Puako and noticing the paimalau1 floating in the sea mistook them for canoes. They began to waver and were again overtaken by the victors. The destruction of the remaining invaders was then complete. Referring to Kauhiakama the son of Kamalalawalu he escaped to safety. The story of his escape running thus:

On the day that the Maui forces were defeated Kauhiakama clandestinely escaped to Kawaihae and from there his intentions were to hie to the caves, there to remain until his side was victorious and then make his appearance.

Hinau, one of the generals of Lonoikamakahiki and a messenger also, had great affection for Kauhiakama, but it was previous to the time of Hinan’s assisting in the escape of Kauhiakama that he roasted some taro and, together with some dried mudfish, already roasted, proceeded to search for Kauhiakama. Hinau came to Kawaihae first and from there went to Kaiopae where for the first time he saw Kauhiakama, so Hinau hailed him and said: “Say, Kauhiakama, remain there until I reach you!” Kauhiakama looking round saw Hinau approaching, the thought of death at the hands of the victorious crossed his mind, so covering his face with his hands he wept, for he was greatly depressed in spirits. Hinau came forward, however, and greeted him with a kiss on the nose, remarking: “I remained behind and roasted some taro and dried mudfish for the love of yon and came to search for you.” These words of Hinau gave Kauhiakama great relief and hopes for life Kauhiakama then ate of the taro prepared by Hinau and when he had finished Hinau assisted Kauhiakama to escape to Main”. Thus was Kauhiakama saved from falling into the hands of his enemies.

Upon Kauhiakama’s return to Maui he sang the praises of Hinau; named his house after him and also the calabashes and fish-bowls. The cultivated fields were also named after him. Everything he possessed was named after Hinau in memory of the many tokens of friendship and kindness shown to him.

Several years afterwards rumors came to Lonoikamakahiki which informed him of the actions of Kauhiakama and of the naming of everything Kauhiakama owned by the name of Hinau. In consequence of this certain messengers were dispatched to Maui by Lonoikamakahiki to get Hinau Before the departure of the emissaries to get Hinau he instructed them thus: “You go and bring Hinau by my command, and should you meet him, say to him to return to Hawaii and govern the country because I am going to Kauai, to view the trunkless koa tree of Kahihikolo. He is to be in my stead and inform him so. Should he board your canoes, take him to Alenuihaha channel, tear him alive in the sea, because he has done wrong by assisting Kauhiakama to escape, thus violating my very commands, to allow no one of Maui with royal blood to live.” After he had given these instructions to his emissaries they set sail for Maui.

When the emissaries met Hinau they learned that he was the greatest man in Maui in the retinue of Kauhiakama and was the latter’s cherished favorite. However, the instructions had to be carried out and the same were discharged in a manner that was entirely pleasing to Lonoikamakahiki.

Hinau heard the wishes of Lonoikamakahiki from the lips of the emissaries, and believing the truth of the message decided to obey the same. Kauhiakama had no intention of allowing Hinau to sail to Hawaii for he was worried lest he return not again to Maui. Hinau, however, was under the belief that he was to rule only during the time of Lonoikamakahiki’s absence on Kauai, and when he returned, he (Hinau) would again return to Maui. Upon Hinau’s boarding the canoes and sailing for Hawaii while yet breathing with life he was cut in two whilst in the open sea by the emissaries in compliance with the instructions of Lonoikamakahiki. So died Hinau. On the return of the men they reported having put Hinau to death in the manner desired, thus gratifying the wishes of Lonoikamakahiki.

CHAPTER XIV.

REFORMATION OF THE GOVERNMENT BY LONOIKAMAKAHIKI.—HE SAILS FOR KAUAL—LONOIKAMAKAHIKI DESERTED BY THE PEOPLE.

After the battle with Kamalalawalu at Waimea and the death of Hinau, Lonoikamakahiki again suggested to sail for Kauai, so that he might view Kahihikolo, the place where the trunkless koa tree was. For that voyage Lonoikamakahiki made preperations to take along with him his favorites, his warriors as companions and also his servants.

Kaikilani in the meantime was placed to rule the land and to care for the people. All preparations having been made the king sailed for Kauai arriving there with his entire retinue. Lonoikamakahiki went alone to view the trunkless tree of Kahihikolo his entire retinue having deserted him. There was a native, however, of the place by the name of Kapaihiahilina who joined the king on his tour. The king while thus journeying happened to look back to see where the rest of his people were and saw only a solitary man following him in the rear. He was a stranger with whom he had no acquaintance Of the large retinue which accompanied him from Hawaii not one was there, every man had deserted.

When the king observed Kapaihiahilina following him, he said not a word to him but continued on with his journey without even a guide to indicate the place he so much desired to see. When Lonoikamakahiki again turned back Kapaihiahilina was still following him. At this stage Lonoikamakahiki asked the man: “Where are you going?” Kapaihiahilina replied: “I merely followed you, because I heard from your people who were on their way back, that they had deserted you, and having sympathy for you, I followed.”

Kapaihiahilina, upon being told that the king had been deserted, took a calabash of poi and some fours of mud-fish, and went in search of the king. It was Kapailnahilina’s habit during the days he followed the king to observe the etiquette due to royalty, that is to say, during the early morning when the royal shadow was the longest, Kapaihiahilina, aware there were only the two of them, did not cross his shadow but always respected his royal dignity and position.

Lonoikamakahiki constantly observed Kapaihiahilina’s conduct as being most respectful of royalty. One day in the course of their journey, Kapaihiahilina, always to the rear of him at a respectable distance both when walking and when at sleep, Lonoikamakahiki said to him: “Do not hold me in sacredness because yon are my own brother. I have nothing dearer than yourself, therefore, where I sleep, there will you sleep also. Do not hold me aloof, because all that is good has passed and we are now traveling in the region of the gods.” In consequence of this, the king’s wishes were observed, and they sat down together.

During their wanderings through the mountains of Kauai, ill the depths of the mountain recesses they became sorely in need of food and had to subsist on the hala kaao. They were in great need of clothing and destitute of malo and had to use braided ferns in substitution thereof. They wandered on in this manner until they arrived at the place which Lonoikamakahiki was so desirous of seeing, which place was called Kahihikolo, but still continued on until they reached the shore. During these travels they were in the greatest distress from lack of food, lack of clothing, lack of malo and also distress from the rains. There was locked in the bosom of Lonoikamakahiki the thought always of how he should some day reward Kapaihiahilina. On their return from their mountain wanderings, Kapaihiahilina became a premier and a great favorite. Whatever belonged to Lonoikamakahiki in large as well as small things which had been left in charge of the men and the petty chiefs, including also the lands, all were under the administration of Kapaihiahilina. Before the eyes of Lonoikamakahiki no one else was superior to Kapaihiahilina and he was supreme over the island of Hawaii. Upon Lonoikamakahiki’s return to Hawaii after his sojourn in the mountains, he took Kapaihiahilina with him to Hawaii and appointed him his premier and held him as an esteemed favorite.

Wherever Lonoikamakahiki slept, there Kapaihiahilina slept also; wherever he lived, there also would Kapaihiahilina reside. The emblem of royal sacredness (puloulou) where his former favorites were not permitted to tread, there would Kapaihiahilina be found. When Lonoikamakahiki arrived on Hawaii with his companion the marshals and the statesmen of Lonoikamakahiki observed that Kapaihiahilina’s favor itism exceeded that of the king’s former favorites, and they became embittered at the idea and were envious of him for the reason that his former favorites never received such consideration.

On a certain day, Lonoikamakahiki assembled all of his nobility and statesmen and declared that Kapaihiahilina was denominated the chief personage of all Hawaii. But this was not agreeable to the chiefs’ views and the court of Lonoikamakahiki.

CHAPTER XV.

KAPAIHIAHILINA APPOINTED PREMIER.—INTRIGUE FOR HIS DOWNFALL. —HIS AFFECTIONATE FAREWELL.

AFTER the installation of Kapaihiahilina as premier for Lonoikamakahiki, he was awarded the ahupuaa called Hihiu nui, the same being located at Kohala. Kapaihiahilina having been inducted into the office of premier, his subordinate officers began to immediately entrap him into some offense. One was found, and a most serious one, but being a very great favorite of Lonoikamakahiki’s the king was loath to entertain any wrong in Kapaihiahilina.

As no incriminating charges could be brought against Kapaihiahilina that would be entertained by the king, the inferior officers made greater efforts to convict him. They finally brought the charge against him of having had illicit intercourse with Kaikilani, the wife of Lonoikamakahiki, brought about principally by the acts of the subordinate officers themselves who studiously prepared the conspiracy. The inferior officers being aware of the illicit relations between Kapaihiahilina and Kaikilani and knowing that it was such an offense from which he could not escape, the conspirators placed the information before Lonoikamakahiki, who upon hearing of it set it aside as being unworthy of his royal attention.

Being unable to implicate Kapaihiahilina in these matters it dawned upon the conspiring officers that Kapaihiahilina was indeed a highly honored favorite of the king, so they gave up conspiring.

Page 336 After being about a year in office as premier, Kapaihiahilina proceeded to Kauai with the intention of returning to resume the premiership. Whilst he was absent on Kauai the king's suite renewed their conspiracy to implicate him in some trouble in his capacity as prime minister and as a favorite of Lonoikaniakahiki. The chiefs immediately around the sovereign brought all manner of accusations of the most contemptuous description against Kapaihiahilina and the idea entered the king's mind that he should be dismissed from his ministerial position as well as losing his place as a favorite.

Lonoikamakahiki then made a solemn pledge that he would not again see the face of Kapaihiahilina. Through the subtle machinations of the royal suite the high esteem of Lonoikamakahiki for Kapaihiahilina ceased.

It was only a short while that Kapaihiahilina remained on Kauai when he heard that he was no longer the premier and favorite. To verify what he had heard relative to his dismissal he sailed for Hawaii. Whilst on the voyage to Hawaii on his canoes he commenced the composition of a song wherein was recited his travels with Lonoikamakahiki in the mountain glens, their escapes from dangers of many descriptions, On the way, he first landed at Kohala, as he desired to see the land which had been given him. Upon arriving there he found that a new konohiki had been installed on the land and the one placed there by him had been dismissed. It was then that he realized his downfall. He set sail for Kona to fully acquaint himself with the commands of the king.

At that time Lonoikaniakahiki was living at Kahaluu and was then conducting temple services. When he came in sight immediately outside of Kahaluu, he was recognized at once by his canoes. In consequence thereof, Lonoikaniakahiki immediately gave orders that the doors of the house be closed. The doors were not, however, closed at once. At the time the canoes reached the shore and Kapaihiahilina commenced wending his way to the king, when nearing the fencing of the house the doors shut. Kapaihiahilina observing the door closing on him stood outside the fence where the sentinels stood. Raising his voice on high he described in chant their wanderings:

Lonoikamakahiki, the sacred one of the high chief,

The sacred chief given birth by Keawe.

The chief was born a king of large possessions.

Lono is like soft mats without number,

[Stretching] from ancient lines

Come the sacred feather capes of Kumalana. It is wrong!

It is wrong for him to maintain his anger.

For the fault is as nothing for the chief to continue being angry.

My father! The great chief,

We have tramped the ground,

We have walked the ground

At Opikananuu, at Opikanalani,

At the plains of Kanuukewe, The base of the isle, the foundation; The foundation of the land where Wakea lived, Wakea the sacred chief. By Keawe was given birth; The right was first given birth, Then followed that which was wrong. The going began with numbers and was continued till few were left; Until lonely and deserted, But two continued tramping in the forest, To where grew the koa tree without roots,1 Above Kahihikolo, Loin-cloth of ferns was made, Ti-leaf was broken and worn at the back;

Thus were we two sheltered from the rain, my companion.

We ate of the ripe pandauus in our wanderings, Thus were our days of hunger appeased, my companion,

My companion of the tall pandanus, From Kilauea to Kalihi; The pandanus that had been partly eaten. Of Pooku in Hanalei.

Thus did we two wander along, my companion. Through the heavy and wind-blown rain, The ceaseless and general rain. We drank of the awa1 of Koukou, The fragrant-leaved awa2 of Mamalahoa.

Say, my companion! A companion, a friend of Lono, a man, A companion of the deafening rains. As the rain traveled in the uplands at Hanaleiiki.

To Hanaleinui,

One rain was from the highlands, One rain was from the lowlands, One rain was from the east, One rain was from the west,3 Along the pandanus cape of Puupaoa. It was there the rain fell on the sand, The sand, food of the kinau,4 The kinau that ate of the ripe pandanus at Hanalei,

The rain that ripens the ohia of Waioli. Cheer up, it is best to be so, chief. The lord,

The lord in our toils at Kanananuu, Of the calm stretches at Kukalaea, Who levels and pushes along

To the sounding-leafed koa.

The battle sounds in the rear.

From the ridge-pole of the house of Maoea.

It was there the rain drops danced in the forest.

The rain in the forest fell low,

The rain in the forest danced about,

The rain in the forest fell softly,

The rain in the forest was like mist,

The rain in the forest fell from all sides,

The rain in the forest fell at the back,

The rain cut furrows in the forest

In the uplands of Laauhaele.

Goest thou ?

As the man prone to idleness [Who] on return, found trouble, found wrong doing,

You have indeed trouble-making servants. I came at your bidding like a messenger; You have dispossessed me, you have ousted me. This my going cannot be laid to others since it is your own making.

The owner of the house has driven me out. The fault would have been mine Had I lived and left without cause, Such action

Would have been a fault on my part, The companion who followed you in all your tribulations. [You] remain,

I am leaving you, my companion, I am going. The rain is passing slightingly, [The rain] of Hopukoa, of Waialoha. Say, there! My greetings to you While you remain in anger.

CHAPTER XVI.

DEPARTURE OF KAPAIHIAHILINA.—LONOIKAMAKAHIKI’S SEARCH FOR HIM.—RETURN AND REINSTATEMENT OF KAPAIHIAHILINA AS PREMIER.

AT the end of Kapaihiahilina’s greetings to Lonoikamakahiki in the chant he retraced his footsteps whence he had come, weeping with affection for the king. Boarding his canoes he sailed away. After Kapaihiahilina had ceased his dedicated chant of Lonoikamakahiki’s name the ancient love surged within his bosom for the loving tribute, the story of their companionship and their wanderings. It was very evident that Kapaihiahilina’s composition was founded on facts. Lonoikamakahiki then ordered the doors of his royal abode to be opened to allow Kapaihiahilina to enter the house. On opening the door of the royal mansion, however, Kapaihiahilina was then outside of Laaloa sailing away.

Lonoikamakahiki observing that Kapaihiahilina had sailed away, sent messengers to get him to return. The messengers, in conformity with the king’s desire, set forth and upon reaching Kapaihiahilina said to him: “We come for you to return; we were sent to beseech you to come back; the king is overwhelmed with love for you and your appeal for compassion by the chant describing your wanderings; when we left the king was still weeping.”

Kapaihiahilina hearing what was said, replied to the messengers: “You both return to the king. Give him my love and say, I cannot go back, because he has harkened to the slanderers who surround him. They may be the ones who accompanied him and ate the ripe flowers of the pandanus of Pooku and girded together the ti leaves as well as the ferns. Therefore I am now homeward bound to bury my bones on Kauai’s shore. If I should die it would be of no moment to him, but should it be he who shall pass away, my companion of many perils, I will weep for him alone at Kauai. Both of you go back.” When Kapaihiahilina finished what he had to say to the messengers, they went back, met the king and reported all that Kapaihiahilina had said.

In consequence of the statements made by the messengers Lonoikamakahiki became very much aggrieved. He immediately ordered his two canoe paddlers, Kapahi and Moanaikaiaiwa, also Kapuniaiakamau and the adopted child of Kamahualele to prepare themselves for the voyage. Prior to Lonoikamakahiki’s sailing he commanded Kaikilani, Kealiiokalani, Kalanioumi and Keakealani thus: “I am about to go; stay on the land; let each of you care for each other and be not envious of one another. If I go and my companion barkens to me, then we will return; but should he listen not, then I will follow him, and by being persistent in my search he may relent, for anger only inflames and reaches the tips of the ears.”

Lonoikamakahiki having ceased his admonitions went aboard the canoes which awaited him and sailed away. In his search he met Kapaihiahilina at Anaehoomalu at the seashore at the dividing line of Kona and Kohala. Thus runs the tradition concerning Lonoikamakahiki’s search for his companion Kapaihiahilina:

When Lonoikamakahiki set sail on his search for his friend, Kapaihiahilina had already arrived at Anaehoomalu and soon afterwards was followed by Lonoikamakahiki and others. Lonoikamakahiki saw Kapaihiahilina sitting on the sand beach when the canoes were being hauled ashore Lonoikamakahiki immediately began to wail and also described their previous wanderings together Kapaihiahilina recognizing the king also commenced wailing. When they came together and had ceased weeping and conversing, then Lonoikamakahiki made a covenant between them, that there would be no more strife, nor would he harken to the voice of slander which surrounds him, and in order that the understanding between them should be made binding, Lono ikamakahiki built a temple of rocks as a place for the offering of their prayers and the making of oaths to Lonoikamakahiki’s god to fully seal the covenant.

Kapaihiahilina observed that Lonoikamakahiki was sincere in his desires and at that moment gave his consent to return with Lonoikamakahiki. After their religious observance at this place they returned to Kona and resided at Kaawaloa, in South Kona.

(Tradition says because of the covenant entered into for the erection of the mound of rocks at Anaehoomalu, the boundary between Kohala and Kona was named Keahualono, and that place has been known ever since by that name signifying the erection of a mound of rocks by Lonoikamakahiki.)

After Lonoikamakahiki and Kapaihiahilina had returned home he resumed the office of premier as formerly. After his reinstatement to his former position a conference was held between him and the king as to how to get rid of the slanderers of Kapaihiahilina from the royal presence. It is stated that Kapaihiahilina had refused to return to Kona with Lonoikamakahiki at the time they met at Anaehoomalu, the exact conversation running as follows: “I will not return with you again until those who slandered me be got rid of from your presence; then only will I return with you.” By reason of this the conference was held. Lonoikamakahiki sought the wishes of Kapaihiahilina as to what disposition should be made of his slanderers, whether they should be slain, and if that, it was agreeable to him also. Should Kapaihiahilina express the desire to banish them, Lonoikamakahiki would acquiesce to that also. Lonoikamakahiki was bent on satisfying Kapaihiahilina’s every wish.

At the conference stated for the consideration of this matter Kapaihiahilina decided to put to death those who had slandered him. In order to mitigate the horrible death which the slanderers would meet, by actual killing, it was decided that they should die in war. In this manner were the slanderers put out of existence. Kapaihiahilina ever after became firmly entrenched as a favorite, and he acted as premier even up to the time of his death.

Thereafter, and up to the time of Lonoikamakahiki’s death, there were no more wars, no rebellions; all was peaceful. After Lonoikamakahiki’s death it is said that the kingdom of Hawaii became the patrimony of Keakealani, and from his reign on to that of the successive kings until the time of Kamehameha, we are told by tradition that no great wars ever again took place. During the reign of Keoua, however, the several district chiefs rebelled.




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